Bx106

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Bx106
x = 56, y = 50, rule = B3/S23 27bo$18b2o5b3o$18b2o4bo$24b2o2$8bo$8bo14b2o$6b3o9b2o3b2o$6bo11b2o7$2o$ bo$bobo$2b2o$48bo$46b3o$45bo$45b2o$33bo$33b3o$2bo21b2o10bo$2bobo19bo 10b2o$2b3o20b3o$4bo16bo5bo$21b3o25b2o$24bo24b2o$23b2o8$54b2o$11b2o11bo b2o26b2o$6b2o3b2o9b3ob2o$6b2o14bo$22bo2$5b2o$6bo4b2o38b2o$3b3o5b2o38bo $3bo48bo$51b2o! #C [[ THUMBSIZE 2 THEME 6 GRID GRIDMAJOR 0 SUPPRESS THUMBLAUNCH ]] #C [[ AUTOSTART ]] #C [[ ZOOM 8 GPS 20 LOOP 117 PAUSE 2 T 106 PAUSE 2 T 116 PAUSE 2 WIDTH 480 HEIGHT 600 THUMBSIZE 2 ]]
Pattern type Conduit
Conduit type Elementary
Conduit for Herschel
Number of cells 26
Output offset (20, -14); (4, 20)
Step 106, 119 ticks
Recovery time 98 ticks
Spartan? Yes
Dependent? No
Discovered by David Buckingham
Year of discovery Unknown

Bx106 is an elementary Herschel duplicator with repeat time 98, discovered by Luka Okanishi on April 13, 2016.[1] The orientations of its two outputs are Fx and Bx, so its full technical name is Bx106_Fx119.

If it is not suppressed, the Fx119 Herschel output must attach to a dependent conduit, as shown in the infobox with an example F166. In the infobox pattern, two ghost Herschels mark the output locations.

This pattern was a considerable improvement on previous known Spartan technology for duplicating Herschel signals, most of which involved variants of a Silver G-to-H or Callahan G-to-H. Even non-Spartan Herschel duplication had been fairly slow and consumed a lot of time and space and half a dozen stages[2], until the discovery of the syringe early in 2015.

References

  1. Luka Okanishi. Re: The Hunting of the New Herschel Conduits (discussion thread) at the ConwayLife.com forums
  2. Adam P. Goucher. Re: Thread For Your Accidental Discoveries (discussion thread) at the ConwayLife.com forums