HexBuss by by Frank Buss

For discussion of other cellular automata.
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simsim314
Posts: 1730
Joined: February 10th, 2014, 1:27 pm

HexBuss by by Frank Buss

Post by simsim314 » March 1st, 2019, 6:41 pm

This is one of the rules in rule table repository and it's also in Ready. HexBuss rule is amazing rule that I didn't find any thread in this forum for it, searching for Hex, Buss and Hex Buss didn't gave any results so I wanted to throw it here.

Some fast 2 minutes sketch:

Code: Select all

x = 948, y = 328, rule = HexBuss
BA$A.A4$6.BA923.AB$5.2BA182.BA741.A$5.2AB.A179.2B.A$8.B.A178.A.AB550.
A180.AB$7.A.B181.2B733.A$8.A3.A180.A732.A3.AB$11.BAB178.A739.AB$10.4A
735.BA179.A2B.A$11.BAB188.2A138.AB404.2BA175.AB2.3AB$19.2A183.B139.A
403.4A174.A.4AB$21.B172.A9.A139.A192.AB211.A177.BAB14.AB$21.A172.A
344.AB388.3A13.A.A$195.BA145.AB193.A2B.A387.3A$344.AB191.A2.A383.A$
14.A328.AB.A191.2B202.BA180.B.A.2A6.A$14.A328.A.B171.A2.BA2.BA2.BA2.B
A2.BA2.A201.A182.3ABAB4.A.A$15.BA201.2A123.ABA174.A3.A3.A3.A3.B.3B
202.A182.A.3A5.AB$220.B119.AB.2ABA190.2A.A193.BA191.B2AB4.AB$220.A
119.A.2AB2A386.2B.A14.BA$341.A.A.A186.A200.A.2A14.A.A$342.6A184.B201.
ABA15.A$344.B.A.B184.A382.A$337.2A4.BA.A.A194.A192.A179.B23.A$337.B2A
5.A182.A13.A.A.AB369.A21.A.A$338.3A10.A176.B7.A4.A.AB.A.A389.A.AB$
339.BA11.B176.A7.BA.AB397.AB$202.A149.A$202.A321.A$203.BA149.2A273$
365.A$365.A.A$366.BA2$363.BA4.AB$363.A7.A3$381.A$363.A$363.B5.2B$364.
A5.2A5.A$370.A.B5.B$371.2A5.A$367.A4.A$368.BA.AB5$367.A10.A$368.BA7.A
B!
And the question: can you make some pattern in HexBuss to not explode?

Code: Select all

@RULE HexBuss

Author: Andrew Trevorrow (andrew@trevorrow.com), Oct 2009.

The following Python transition function implements Frank Buss's
3-state rule on a hexagonal grid, as described here:

http://www.frank-buss.de/automaton/hexautomaton.html

The @TREE data was created by copying the Python code to the
clipboard and then running Golly's make-ruletree.py script.

-------------------- start copying
name = "HexBuss"
n_states = 3
n_neighbors = 8
def transition_function(s):
    # s[0..8] are cell states in the order NW, NE, SW, SE, N, W, E, S, C
    # but we ignore the NE and SW corners to emulate a hexagonal grid:
    #             NW N NE         NW  N
    #             W  C  E   ->   W  C  E
    #             SW S SE         S  SE
    
    # set n1 and n2 to the number of neighbors in states 1 and 2
    n1 = 0
    n2 = 0
    for i in xrange(8):
        # ignore s[1] and s[2]
        if i < 1 or i > 2:
            if s[i] == 1: n1 += 1
            if s[i] == 2: n2 += 1
    
    if s[8] == 0 and n1 == 0 and n2 == 1:
        return 2
    elif n1 == 1 and n2 == 1:
        return 1
    elif n2 == 2:
        return 1
    elif n2 == 3:
        return 2
    else:
        return 0
-------------------- end copying

@TREE

# Automatically generated by make-ruletree.py.
num_states=3
num_neighbors=8
num_nodes=44
1 0 0 0
1 2 0 0
2 0 0 1
1 1 1 1
2 0 0 3
2 1 3 3
3 2 4 5
2 0 0 0
2 3 0 3
3 4 7 8
1 2 2 2
2 3 3 10
3 5 8 11
4 6 9 12
3 7 7 4
3 8 4 11
4 9 14 15
2 10 10 0
3 11 11 17
4 12 15 18
5 13 16 19
3 4 4 11
4 14 14 21
4 15 21 18
5 16 22 23
3 17 17 7
4 18 18 25
5 19 23 26
6 20 24 27
7 28 28 28
8 29 29 29
4 21 21 18
5 22 22 31
5 23 31 26
6 24 32 33
7 34 34 34
8 35 35 35
3 7 7 7
4 25 25 37
5 26 26 38
6 27 33 39
7 40 40 40
8 41 41 41
9 30 36 42

@COLORS

0 48 48 48
1 0 255 255   (cyan)
2 255 255 0   (yellow)

@ICONS

hexagons
Attachments
HexBuss.zip
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Last edited by simsim314 on March 1st, 2019, 8:15 pm, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
Moosey
Posts: 2717
Joined: January 27th, 2019, 5:54 pm
Location: A house, or perhaps the OCA board.
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Re: HexBuss by by Frank Buss

Post by Moosey » March 1st, 2019, 7:12 pm

Impressive collision:

Code: Select all

x = 6, y = 8, rule = HexBuss
3.A$4.BA5$AB$2.A!
Are there any rules like this for moore neighborhood?

EDIT:
natural rake:

Code: Select all

x = 5, y = 6, rule = HexBuss
.BA$BA$A.2B$.ABA$4.B$3.A!
I am a prolific creator of many rather pathetic googological functions

My CA rules can be found here

Also, the tree game
Bill Watterson once wrote: "How do soldiers killing each other solve the world's problems?"

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