Star Wars Rule

For discussion of other cellular automata.
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calcyman
Posts: 2108
Joined: June 1st, 2009, 4:32 pm

Re: Star Wars Rule

Post by calcyman » September 25th, 2010, 8:36 am

--An easy way to convert between gliders and "electrons".
I thought that I'd already provided this:

Code: Select all

x = 43, y = 30, rule = 345/2/4
2.A2.A2.A2.A26.A2.A$.42A$2.A11.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A5.A3$8.A2.A$7.6A
$6.2A3.A$5.2A4.A$4.2A5.2A$5.A5.A$5.A5.A$4.9A$5.A2.A2.A3$31.A2.A2.A$
30.9A$5.2C24.A5.A$5.2B24.A5.A$5.2A23.2A5.2A$31.A4.2A$31.A3.2A$30.6A$
31.A2.A3$.A5.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A11.A$42A$.A2.A26.A2.A2.A2.A!
p OR q= Not[Not[p] AND Not[q]]
Yes, De Morgan equivalence.


XOR can also be expressed as: (A AND NOT B) # (B AND NOT A). AND-NOT gates are usually trivial to implement with glider logic:

Code: Select all

x = 22, y = 22, rule = 345/2/4
9.A2.A2.A2.A$8.12A$9.A8.A3$.2C$C2.C$C2.C$4C4.CBA$C2.C4.CBA$C2.C$C2.C
2$13.2A$13.2B$13.2C3.3C$18.C2.C$18.C2.C$18.3C$18.C2.C$18.C2.C$18.3C!
The '#' operator has the following truth table:

A B result
0 0 0
0 1 1
1 0 1
1 1 never occurs

So, an OR gate or XOR gate would suffice; so would a gate that explodes when both inputs are activated.



I prefer asynchronous circuitry (latches, split and merge components) to Boolean gates. Can you implement an asynchronous (period-1) latch? A possible method would be to synthesise and destroy a 'cross' still-life.


--Crossovers.


That can be composed from three XOR gates, or eight NAND gates, or a myriad other ways. See Dewdney, A. K., Minimal crossovers, or Buckley, W. R., Signal-crossing solutions in von Neumann cellular automata.
What do you do with ill crystallographers? Take them to the mono-clinic!

Awesomeness
Posts: 126
Joined: April 5th, 2009, 7:30 am

Re: Star Wars Rule

Post by Awesomeness » September 25th, 2010, 2:04 pm

137ben wrote: The remaining pieces of logic circuits seem to be:
--An easy way to convert between gliders and "electrons".
--Crossovers.
Glider to electron:

Code: Select all

x = 43, y = 20, rule = 345/2/4
CBA$CBA5.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A$7.36A$8.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A
2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A5$CBA$CBA5.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A$7.36A
$8.A5.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A5$CBA$CBA5.A5.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.
A2.A2.A$7.36A$8.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A!
Electron to glider: (From the second arbitrarily high period gun)

Code: Select all

x = 30, y = 14, rule = 345/2/4
4.A2.A$3.6A$4.A3.2A$4.A4.2A$3.2A5.2A$4.A5.A$4.A5.A$3.9A$4.A2.A2.A2$
27.ABC$.A11.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A$30A$.A2.A2.A2.A17.A!
Crossing would likely involve changing signals (how about signals and electrons be interchangeable?) intro gliders.

Here's a few neat objects:

Code: Select all

x = 149, y = 254, rule = 345/2/4
45.A.BA.CB$44.3ACBA.C$44.3ACB$46.A.B$46.A.B$44.3ACB$44.3ACBA.C$45.A.B
A.CB9$56.B$49.ABC3.C.C$47.ABC.AB$45.ABC5.C.C.C$43.ABC.A5.C2AB$41.ABC
2.B4.C.2B$39.ABC.ABC.A5.CA$39.ABC3.ABC5.CBA$47.ABC.ABA$49.ABC57$36.A.
CBA.CBA.CBA.CBA.CBA.CBA.CBA.CBA.CBA.CBA.C$34.2ABA.CBA.CBA.CBA.CBA.CBA
.CBA.CBA.CBA.CBA.CBA.B$34.2ABA.CBA.CBA.CBA.CBA.CBA.CBA.CBA.CBA.CBA.CB
AC$36.A.CBA.CBA.CBA.CBA.CBA.CBA.CBA.CBA.CBA.CBA$63.A.2A$64.2A$63.A2BA
$64.2A$63.C2.C25.C$63.B2CB24.CB$63.A2BA23.CBA$64.2A23.CBA$63.C2.C21.C
BA$63.B2CB15.B.C2.CBA$63.A2BA14.C.C2.CBA$64.2A15.B.BACBA$63.C2.C14.AC
A.BA$63.B2CB15.B.CA$63.A2BA11.C3.ACB$64.2A12.B4.BA$48.2A13.C2.C11.AC
2.CA$48.2A13.B2CB12.B2CB$47.A2BA12.A2BA12.A2BA$48.2A14.A15.A$47.C2.C
13.2C14.C$47.B2CB13.2B$47.A2BA13.2A$48.2A$47.C2.C12.C2.C$47.B2CB12.B
2CB$47.A2BA12.A2BA$48.2A14.2A$47.C2.CBA$47.BC2BCBA$48.2A.A.CBA$54.CBA
$32.2A13.C2.C4.CB$32.2A13.B2CB2.C3.C$31.A2BA12.A2BA3.C$32.2A14.2A3.B$
31.C2.C19.C.C6.C2.C13.2C$31.B2CB20.B7.B2CB13.2B$31.A2BA28.A2BA13.2A$
35.A28.2A$30.CB2.BCBA41.C2.C$31.B2CB.CBA14.CBA23.B2CB$30.A.ABA2.CBA
13.CBA23.A2BA$25.C4.AB.A5.CBA6.AB.C.A26.2A$28.ABC.C6.CBA6.BCBCB18.CBA
$28.ABC.A2.A11.C25.CBA$20.BC.B2.C2.AB.3ABA6.3AB.BC23.CBA$18.AC.B.C3A.
A2.2A.A.CBA.C.A2BA.2A$15.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.2A.B.AB2C.C.A.A.C$14.22A
.AC2.B3.B6A$14.A.B18.A.B.BAC2.CA4.A27.C$12.5ABC17.C2.BC8.C.AB25.B16.C
$11.A.A.C.2A2C16.BC9.BACA26.AC2.C12.B2C$10.5ABC2.2B28.C2BA26.B2CB12.A
2B$10.A.B131.A$8.137A.A$.A.BA.CA.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.
A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A
.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.2A.C$3ACA.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.
A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A
.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.2AB$147A.A$145.A$.ABC140.A
BC$ABC$ABC69$49.A.CBA.CBA.CBA.CBA.CBA.CBA.CBA.CBA.CB2.C$47.2ABA.CBA.C
BA.CBA.CBA.CBA.CBA.CBA.CBA.C$47.2ABA.CBA.CBA.CBA.CBA.CBA.CBA.CBA.CBA
5.B2.C$49.A.CBA.CBA.CBA.CBA.CBA.CBA.CBA.CB6.CACA.B$80.ABCB3.A.2BC$82.
C.AC.2A$81.C3.B2A.BA$85.A2.CB$88.CBA$76.2A7.CB$75.A2B5.C.C$74.AB2CA3.
B2.2A$73.ABC2.BAC2.CA2B.C$57.A.CBA.C10.A3.C.B.AB.2C$55.2ABA.CB2.ABA4.
A.2A2.A2.3A.C2.C$55.2ABA.C.2ACA4.CB2A.A2BCA.A.A.AB30.ABC$56.A.A.A.A.A
.A.A.A.C.A.C.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A$57.62AB$59.A.A.A.A.A.A.A
.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A.A$59.ABC.2ACB.B3ABA.BA.C3.C.A.CBC
27.BC$61.ABC3.C.C4.C.2A.BCB3ABA$62.ABC3.B8.4A.A2.C$76.C.A3.CA3.C$76.B
C3.CB4.B2C$76.ABC2.BA5.AB$77.AB2CA$78.A2B9.C$79.2A9.B$91.CBA$88.A2.CB
$84.C3.B2A.BA$85.C.AC.2A$83.ABCB3.A.2BC$52.A.CBA.CBA.CBA.CBA.CBA.CBA.
CBA.CB6.CACA.B$50.2ABA.CBA.CBA.CBA.CBA.CBA.CBA.CBA.CBA5.B2.C$50.2ABA.
CBA.CBA.CBA.CBA.CBA.CBA.CBA.CBA.C$52.A.CBA.CBA.CBA.CBA.CBA.CBA.CBA.CB
A.CB2.C!
The bottom one looks like a wire puffer but it's not.
EDIT: Ninja'd by a much better post.

Karatorian
Posts: 21
Joined: September 18th, 2010, 10:56 am
Location: Rindge, NH, USA
Contact:

Stable Reflectors

Post by Karatorian » September 26th, 2010, 4:45 am

While playing around with Calcyman's glider to signal converter, I discovered three stable reflectors. Actually, two of them are duplicators, but they can be turned into reflectors (if desired) by adding an eater (a properly positioned cross works nicely) to clean up the extra glider.

Code: Select all

x = 50, y = 39, rule = 345/2/4
7.C17.2C$6.2C19.C$7.C18.C$7.C19.C$CBA3.3C16.2C$CBA$5.A2.A2.A13.A2.A$
4.9A11.6A$2BC2.A5.A13.A3.2A$2BC2.A5.A8.CBA2.A4.2A$4.2A5.2A7.CBA.2A5.
2A$5.2A4.A13.A5.A$6.2A3.A13.A5.A6.C$7.6A11.9A4.3C7.C2B$8.A2.A13.A2.A
2.A6.C8.C2B2$26.2C$26.2B$26.2B2$6.2C$8.C$7.C$6.C$6.3C2$CBA2.A2.A$CBA.
6A$5.A3.2A$5.A4.2A$4.2A5.2A$5.A5.A$5.A5.A6.C$4.9A4.3C7.C2B$5.A2.A2.A
6.C8.C2B2$6.2C$6.2B$6.2B!
The ghosted gliders provide the location of the output when it clears the structure. The ghost crosses show how to turn the duplicators into clean reflectors.

The first one is a 180 degree reflector (plus a small translation) that takes 38 ticks to get from the start state to the position the ghost is at. The other two are 90 degree duplicators. They both output one glider with a translation and another perpendicular to the input. The second takes 33 ticks and the third takes 41 ticks.

It's possible that smaller still lifes could perform the same functions, but I haven't found any yet. Smaller objects would also probably be faster.

EDIT

After taking a second look at Axaj's SR Latch, I realized that he's using some reflectors and duplicators that are better than the one's I just posted. Now I just look silly. So here they are.

Code: Select all

x = 51, y = 21, rule = 345/2/4
25.2C18.2C$25.2B18.2B$25.2A18.2A$29.A$25.A2.3A14.A2.C2B$2BC21.3A.2A
14.3A.C2B$2BC22.A3.A15.A$28.3A$29.A11.A$40.3A$41.A2$18.A2.A2.A$17.9A$
18.A5.A$18.A5.A$17.2A5.2A$18.A4.2A$18.A3.2A$13.2BC.6A$13.2BC2.A2.A!
The reflector takes 16 ticks and the duplicator takes 35 ticks. However, the real advantage to these isn't in the propagation delay of an individual glider, rather, it's that they can begin handling a second glider much sooner. This is something I didn't examine in the devices I found earlier.

The reflector can handle p15 glider streams, which is practically the same time it takes to traverse the device, but still much faster than mine. The duplicator is even faster and can handle p13 streams. In contrast, my 180 degree reflector can only handle p37 or slower streams. One of the 90 degree duplicators is a little better, as it can handle 25p streams, but the other is nearly as bad, at p36.
Last edited by Karatorian on September 29th, 2010, 12:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
ynotds
Posts: 31
Joined: August 23rd, 2010, 8:38 am
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Contact:

Re: Star Wars Rule

Post by ynotds » September 26th, 2010, 9:29 am

If I can sidetrack a bit from the logic circuits, I've been playing with this rule off and on for a few months, mostly through long runs starting from a couple of deliberately asymmetric variants I made based on the common diamond growth pattern:

Code: Select all

x = 12, y = 7, rule = 345/2/4
ABC$ABC.A$2.ABCBA$3.ABCBA$5.ABCBA$7.A.CBA$9.CBA!
which I've run to 50,000. and

Code: Select all

x = 11, y = 7, rule = 345/2/4
4.ABA$2.ABC.BA$ABC3.CBA$ABC5.CBA$2.ABC3.CBA$4.ABCBA$5.ABA!
which I've run to 40,000.

A few of the things I've bothered saving:

Three different ways of generating the common diamond:

Code: Select all

x = 31, y = 202, rule = 345/2/4
2.CBA$2.CBA$CBA25$28.2A$28.2B$27.A2C$27.B$27.C57$22.CBA$22.CBA$29.A$
12.CBA13.3A$14.CBA12.A$14.CBA88$28.C$28.B2C$28.A2B$29.2A13$12.CBA$13.
CBA.CBA$14.CBA.CBA$14.CBA.CBA$13.CBA.CBA!
Two high density space filler heads, the tails of which I haven't got close to stabilising:

Code: Select all

x = 52, y = 126, rule = 345/2/4
B$.C.A$2.BAB5.B$2A.C.C.B.C.C.A$.2A.2A.2A3.BAB5.B$.2A.2A.2A.2A.C.C.B.C
.C.A$A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A3.BAB5.B$A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.C.C.B.C.C.A
10.CBA$2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A3.BAB7.C3.CBA$2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.
2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.C.C.B3.B2.CA2.CBA$.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A
.2A3.CA.ABA.CBA$.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2AC2A.CBA$
2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.CBA$.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.
2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.C.C.B2.CBA$.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.
2A3.BAB3.CBA$2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.C.C.A$2A.2A.2A.2A.2A
.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A3.BAB$A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.C.C.B.C.C.A$A.2A.2A
.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A3.BAB5.B$.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.C.C.B.C.C.A$.2A.2A.2A.2A3.BAB
5.B$2A.2A.C.C.B.C.C.A$2A3.BAB5.B$B.C.C.A$3.B80$.C39.CBA$3.A11.2A17.A.
A5.CBA$2.BCBA.3A5.2BA14.AB.B.BA4.CBA$.2AC2.B.3AC3.CA9.ABC3.CBCBCBC6.C
BA$C.B.B.3A.A5.2A9.B2CB.A3.A5.A3.CBA$3.2A.AC.2A4.2A9.AB3.2CB4.A2.B.BC
A2.CBA$2A2.A.2A2.A.CA2.A.C.B2.B2.AC.AB2.A.4A.C.C2.ABA.CBA$.2A.2A.2A.
2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.B2.2A2.A.2A.BA.2A.2AC2A.CBA$2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A
.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.CBA$.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.
2A2.CBA$A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.C.C.B2.CBA$A.2A.2A.2A.
2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A3.BAB3.CBA$.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.C
.C.A$.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A3.BAB$2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.C.C.
B.C.C.A$2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A3.BAB5.B$A.2A.2A.2A.2A.C.C.B.C.C.A$A.2A.
2A.2A3.BAB5.B$.2A.C.C.B.C.C.A$3.BAB5.B$C.C.A$.B!
Amongst a limited survey of simple collision products, one stood out:

Code: Select all

x = 5, y = 15, rule = 345/2/4
3.A$2.3A$3.A8$2.2A$.A2B$AB2C$BC$C!
sufficiently to inspire a YouTube animation.

Plus a few common enough finds that may not have been mentioned above:

Code: Select all

x = 19, y = 15, rule = 345/2/4
10.2A$9.A2BA$8.AB2CBA$7.ABC2.CB$6.ABC.2A.C$ABC2.ABC.A2BA$ABC.ABC.AB2C
BA$2.ABC.ABC3.A3.A$3.ABC.ABC8A$11.A.A.A.2A$11.2A.A.2A$11.2A.A.2A$10.
2A.A.A.2A$11.7A$12.A3.A!

Code: Select all

x = 8, y = 9, rule = 345/2/4
6.C$A.A2.A.A$B6AB$.A.2A.A$.2A2.2A$.A.2A.A$B6AB$A.A2.A.A$.C!

Code: Select all

x = 15, y = 9, rule = 345/2/4
12.2A$11.A2BA$10.AB2CB$10.BC2.C$9.AC$.A.BA.CBA.2BA$3ACBA.CB2.CBA$3ACB
A.CBA.CBA$.A.BA.CBA.CBA!

Code: Select all

x = 8, y = 73, rule = 345/2/4
5.2A$5.2B$5.2C2$5.2A$5.2B$5.2C2$5.2A$5.2B$5.2C2$5.2A$5.2B$5.2C$3.A.A$
.C.B4A$B.A2.A.B$4AB.C$2.A.A$CBA$B$AC$.B$CA$B$AC$.B$CA$B$AC$.B$CA$B$AC
$.B$CA$B$AC$.B$CA$B$AC$.B$CA$B$AC$.B$CA$B$AC$.B$CA$B$AC$.B$CA$B$AC$.B
$CA$B$AC$.B$CA$B$AC$.B$.AC$2.BC$2.AB2C$3.A2B$4.2A!

Code: Select all

x = 74, y = 151, rule = 345/2/4
67.2A$66.A2B$66.B2C$66.C$67.2A$66.A2B$66.B2C$66.C$67.2A$66.A2B$66.B2C
$66.C$67.2A$66.A2B$66.B2C$66.C$67.2A$66.A2B$66.B2C$66.C$67.2A$66.A2B$
66.B2C$66.C$67.2A$66.A2B$66.B2C$66.C$67.2A$66.A2B$66.B2C$66.C$67.2A$
66.A2B$66.B2C$66.C$67.2A$66.A2B$66.B2C$66.C$67.2A$66.A2B$66.B2C$66.C$
67.2A$66.A2B$66.B2C$66.C$67.2A$66.A2B$66.B2C$66.C$67.2A$66.A2B$66.B2C
$66.C$67.2A$66.A2B$66.B2C$66.C$67.2A$66.A2B$66.B2C$66.C$67.2A$66.A2B$
66.B2C$66.C$67.2A$66.A2B$66.B2C$66.C2.A$66.A.A.B$64.C.4A.C$64.B2A3.A.
B$64.A.3A.2A$66.A.2A.2AB$.ABC9.ABC9.ABC9.ABC9.ABC9.ABC2.2A.A2.A$ABC9.
ABC9.ABC9.ABC9.ABC9.ABC2.CA.A3.A$ABC9.ABC9.ABC9.ABC9.ABC9.ABC3.7A$66.
C4.A.C$71.AB3$70.C$70.BC$70.ABC$68.C2.AB$66.2CB3.AC$66.2BA2.C.B$66.2A
3.BCA$71.AB$72.AC$73.B$72.CA$72.B$71.CA$70.CB$69.CBA$68.CBA$66.2CBA$
66.2BA$66.2A6$70.C$70.BC$70.ABC$68.C2.AB$66.2CB3.AC$66.2BA2.C.B$66.2A
3.BCA$71.AB$72.AC$73.B$72.CA$72.B$71.CA$70.CB$69.CBA$68.CBA$66.2CBA$
66.2BA$66.2A6$70.C$70.BC$70.ABC$68.C2.AB$66.2CB3.AC$66.2BA2.C.B$66.2A
3.BCA$71.AB$72.AC$73.B$72.CA$72.B$71.CA$70.CB$69.CBA$68.CBA$66.2CBA$
66.2BA$66.2A!

Code: Select all

x = 85, y = 27, rule = 345/2/4
8.2A$8.2B$8.2C$80.CBA$78.CBA.CBA$11.CA69.CBA$12.B69A$10.C2.A.A.A.A.B.
A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.AC3A$12.BC4.A.
3A.B.A.CB.B.A.A.CAC.C.CA.A.A2.BC.AC.AB2.BC.AC.AB2.BC.AC.AB.A$17.C2A2.
A.C2.BA.ACACAC2B.B2.2BA.CBA$17.B.C.3CB.C4.AB.B.3A3.2A$20.2BABA8.A$20.
3A15.C$37.CB$37.BA$36.CA$34.2CB$3.C30.2BA$2.CB30.2A$2CBA$2BA27.C$2A
27.CB$29.BA$28.CA$26.2CB$26.2BA$26.2A!

Code: Select all

x = 22, y = 32, rule = 345/2/4
13.B$ABC2.ABC4.C.C$ABC.ABC5.B.BC$2.ABC2.ABC3.CA.A2.A$3.ABC.ABC4.B.2BA
BA$4.ABC.A2B4AC.2CBC$5.ABC2.C.A2.B.C$6.ABCABCB.BA$10.2A.2CA$9.3A.2B$
9.A4.A$10.BCBA$11.CBA5.AB$18.BC.C$9.C7.C2.A$16.B2.2BA$11.C.A.C3.2CB$
10.C.3A.2AB2.C$11.BA.B.2A2.A$12.2A.A.B.2BA$10.BCA3.CA.2CB$9.A.AB.CBAB
C2.C$10.B.A.B2A2.2A$11.2AC2A2.A2BA$11.A2.B3.B2CB$10.3AC4.C2.C$11.BA6.
2A$10.4A4.A2BA$11.2A5.B2CB$19.2A$18.4A$19.2A!

Code: Select all

x = 34, y = 39, rule = 345/2/4
25.2A$24.4A$25.2A$24.B2CB$24.A2BA$25.2A$24.C2.C$24.B2CB$24.A2BA$25.2A
$24.C2.C$24.B2CB$24.A2BA$25.2A$19.ABC$18.ABC9.CBA$9.2A6.ABC11.CBA$8.
3A.A3.ABC5.4A.A.CBA$8.BC2ABA3.BC3.AB.2B.B.BA$7.A.A.CBC.B2A2BC2.2AC.CB
C$5.A2.2A4.C.C3.B.2A.2A$4.A.A.A.A.A.A.A3.A.A.A.A.A.A2.C$2.31AB$.A.A.A
.A.A.A.A.A3.A.A.A7.A.A$3ACA.CB.C2A.2A.A2.4A7.2A$3ACBA.B2AB.AC.A2.B.AC
2.C2.C3.AB$.A.BA.C6.BA.2AC.C3.ABA.B2A$12.AB.2A.2B5.BC2.A$13.ACA.3A6.C
BA$14.2BA3.C$14.2A2.C$17.CB8.CBA$22.C4.CBA$20.C.B3.CBA$20.BCA2.CBA$
20.AB2.CBA$21.A2CBA$22.2BA$22.2A!

Code: Select all

x = 29, y = 6, rule = 345/2/4
10.C7.C$ABC.ABC.AB.7A.BA.CBA.CBA$ABC.ABC.AB2A.A.A.2ABA.CBA.CBA$9.C.2A
.A.2A.C$12.5A$11.AB3.BA!

Code: Select all

x = 20, y = 14, rule = 345/2/4
4.BA2.C$3.C.A2.A$4.5A.C$.C.2A.A.2ABA.CBA.CBA$B.A.2A2.A.BA.CBA.CBA$.C.
2A.3AC$4.3A$3.C.A.C$4.B.B$5.A2$5.2C$5.2B$5.2A!

Karatorian
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Re: Star Wars Rule

Post by Karatorian » September 28th, 2010, 1:06 am

I haven't looked though all your finds yet, but while working on some circuit stuff, I accidentally caused some chaos and, for a change of pace, started collecting finds (Mostly guns and variants of the common orthogonal backrake/wickstreatcher that turn it into different rakes). I'll have to organize a stamp collection sometime.

Speaking of the diamond growth pattern (which I think we should call the domino pattern), has anyone figured out when it stabilizes yet? I've figured out when the block pattern stabilizes, but exactly when depends on a nit picky detail that I'd like your thoughts on.

The last interesting thing to happen is that eight crosses turn into p4 oscillators. At generation 2164, they come into contact with (moving) diagonal wicks. At generation 2178, they reach one of the phases of the p4. Which I think is the stabilization point.

Now, here's the tricky bit. These oscillators continue to come into contact with wicks and get temporarily altered while they cut them. The last three phases of this wick cutting process is the same as the last three phases of the reaction that turned the cross into a p4. However, they're only the same when viewed in isolation. The wick involved is at a different position in the two cases (because the wick cutting is faster). So I'm fairly certain they don't really count.

Is this reasoning correct? If so, I guess we could call the block reaction M2178. Although, I think the definition of a Methuselah might have to be changed in this rule, because patterns tend towards longer lifespans.

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Re: Star Wars Rule

Post by ynotds » September 28th, 2010, 7:10 am

Clearly, I've been so focused on 345/3/6 (aka LivingOnTheEdge) that I've all but forgotten Methuselahs, or at least come to think of their end state as "debris", so I've not been surprised that most of the Star Wars patterns I've run on have shown no sign of stabilising.

I have run the diamond from a two cell seed to 15,000, saving every thousand. I've just done a screen capture of the central region at 14,000 and 15,000 sign by side and uploaded it. My guess is that there is little to be read into the central region at 15,000 appearing a lot quieter than at 14,000.

While I started studying 345/3/6 with a doubly symmetric seed, I eventually conceded that asymmetric seeds explore four times as many possibilities for my computer cycles, which is why I've mostly explored Star Wars through such lenses, including a P pentomino seed to 5,000 before I focused on the diamonds.

For what it's worth, I found I have a saved pattern called block-2178 which presumably reflects an earlier judgment that it is settled at 2178.

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Re: Star Wars Rule

Post by Karatorian » September 28th, 2010, 8:55 pm

So here's a first draft of an article type thing I'm working on. Let me know what you think.

--- Cut Here --- Start ---

Basic Spaceships in the Star Wars Rule - Part One

While playing around with the Star Wars rule, I've discovered that there are two basic classes of spaceships, those with a period one front end and those with a period two front end. This discusses the structure of period one based spaceships.

The basic period one spaceship looks like this:

Code: Select all

	OO
	oo
	..
This basic ship also forms the head of other spaceships. These spaceships are formed by attaching a simple component to this ship. This component is merely one half of the basic ship (also known as a "signal" or "electron").

There are two basic ways in which the component can be attached to each other, and therefore the to the basic ship. They are as follows:

Code: Select all

	 OO
	Ooo
	o..O
	.  o
	   .
These components can be chained in this way to create arbitrarily large spaceships. Next, I will discuss a subset of the spaceships that can be created via this method.

If one considers only spaceships in which additional components are only attached to the outside edges of the ship, there are a limited number of locations where components may be attached. Each component may be connected to it's neighbor at one of two offsets.

By creating a list of these offsets, a spaceship of this type can be reduced to a simple string. The head of the spaceship consists of two of the components with no offset, so I will designate this connection '0'. The two possible offsets for additional components, I will designate '1' and '2' respectively.

So, given a string such as '12110221', we can construct the spaceship as follows:

Code: Select all

	    OO
	   Ooo
	  Oo..O
	  o.  o
	 O.   .O
	Oo     oO
	o.     .o
	.       .
Note that the number of components, and therefore the width of the ship, is one larger than the number of connections, which is also the length of the string.

Many common spaceships are of this form and so can be succinctly described using this notation. However, there are other spaceships built from this basic component which cannot, because they employ a wider set of connections.

Perhaps the simplest such spaceship is this one.

Code: Select all

	OO
	oo
	..O
	  o
	 O.
	 o
	 .
This ship consists of a head and two components attached with type '2' connections, however, as the second connection isn't towards the outside of the ship, the string '022' cannot (unambiguously) describe it.

At this point, it may seem that the notation can simply be extended to indicate which side the connection is made on, and so, the ship could be described as a string such as '02<2' or '024'. However, this notation quickly becomes inadequate when faced with constructions such as this:

Code: Select all

	OO
	oo
	..O
	  o
	 O.O
	 o o
	 . .
This pattern isn't a spaceship proper, however, it is the grandparent of a period two spaceship which is built on the same basic structure.

As it is possible (in some cases) for a component to have connections on both sides, their configuration can no longer be represented by a simple sequence (such as string), but must rather be represented as a binary tree.

For example, the above spaceship (precursor) may be described by the following tree:

Code: Select all

	0
	 \
	  2
	 / \
	2   2
By starting with such a tree, one can then define a serialization of the tree to once again reduce the configuration of the spaceship to a string. It would be desirable if this serialization would produce the same strings as the simplified notation I defined earlier.

For example, in the simple notation '101' defines a very common spaceship. Here is that ship and it's binary tree:

Code: Select all

	 OO	   0
	OooO	 / \
	o..o	1   1
	.  .
By defining the output of the tree serialization as the results of a tree traversal that in the case of trees definable by the simple notation visits the nodes in the same order as the simple notation's output, a compatible serialization format can be defined.

For instance, when handling the above tree, the traversal function should visit the nodes by starting at the left node, proceed to it's parent (the root) and then down to the right node.

The type of tree traversal that visits the nodes in this order is known as in-order traversal and can be defined by the following Python code:

Code: Select all

def inorder(node):
	if node.left: inorder(node.left)
	print node.value
	if node.right: inorder(node.right)
However, simply listing the nodes in in-order value isn't sufficient to give an unambiguous serialization of the tree, because different trees may have the same order. Therefore, one also needs to add information regarding the tree's structure to the serialization. There are various methods for doing this, but I've selected one based on the criteria of backwards compatibility with the simple notation.

To achieve this end, I only include information on the tree's structure where it differs from the simple linear list type trees. This works by defining a current direction which is maintained as follows:
  • The current direction starts out left.
  • When following link to a child node, change the current direction to the direction of the link.
  • After traversing the root node, change the current direction to right.
The current direction is used to include tree structure information into the string, as follows:
  • When following a link that doesn't point in the current direction, output an open parenthesis before following the link.
  • When returning from a link that didn't point in the (then) current direction, output an close parenthesis after returning from the link.
This can be demonstrated by the following example Python code:

Code: Select all

def inorder(node, d=0):
	if node.left:
		if d: print '('
		inorder(node.left, 0)
		if d: print ')'
	
	print node.value
	if node.value == '0': d = 1
	
	if node.right:
		if not d: print '('
		inorder(node.right, 1)
		if not d: print ')'
This defines a single string that can be used to clearly identify a given spaceship of this type, derived directly from it's structure. For example, this moderately complex ship:

Code: Select all

	    OO
	    ooO
	   O..o
	   o  .
	  O.O
	 Oo oO
	 o. .oO
	O.   .oO
	o     .o
	.O     .
	 o
	O.
	o
	.
Can be represented by the following binary tree:

Code: Select all

	        0
	       / \
	      2   1
	     / \
	    2   2
	   /     \
	  1       1
	 /         \
	2           1
	 \           \
	  2           1
	 /
	2
Which can be reduced to '2((2)2)122(2111)01'. Not exactly the prettiest name for a spaceship, but it's something.

--- Cut Here --- End ---

So there you have it. I hope people can figure out the diagrams in the picture type format I invented. It's a pity that Golly (AFAICT) doesn't support picture formats for multi-state rules. If it did, then I'd be able to include diagrams that could be loaded up and played with.

I'm not sure if I'm explaining things well enough. This is mostly a dump of an idea I had kicking around in my head for a while, so I've thought about it quite a bit and it's hard to know if my explanations are comprehensible to others. The most basic ideas (that many spaceships are just gliders plus some electrons) are pretty easy. (And I'm sure, well known.) However, once I start getting into binary trees and traversal algorithms and what-not, am I making any sense?

At the end, it just kinda dies off. I guess I managed to get down the idea I'd been musing on and now need to think some more. There's a lot that could be discussed, but I haven't really investigated a whole lot. (Mostly this idea just came to me as I watched the various spaceships in chaotic patterns.)

Interesting ideas to cover would how some configurations become spaceships of longer periods, how such spaceships can become rakes or puffers, how some spaceships that could be described by a binary tree cannot actually be built, or are unstable and decay into something else.

Finally, there are some spaceships that are mostly built out of the standard three cell component, but cannot be encoded as a simple binary tree as discussed here. Some of these are the result of running such a description, but the components interact to create more complex behavior. These aren't really an issue, as their precursor can be described, which should suffice. However, others are more complicated. These either are a flotilla in which a sparker is perturbed by another spaceship, or a spaceship who's non-period-one components include configurations that don't arise naturally from the interaction of the period one parts.

This is labeled part one as part two is supposed to cover the spaceships with a period two front end, however I haven't really looked into them much yet (other than playing with some beam stretchers) and don't know if such a grammar exists for them.

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Re: Star Wars Rule

Post by ynotds » September 29th, 2010, 2:52 am

Interesting ideas to cover would how some configurations become spaceships of longer periods, how such spaceships can become rakes or puffers, how some spaceships that could be described by a binary tree cannot actually be built, or are unstable and decay into something else.

Finally, there are some spaceships that are mostly built out of the standard three cell component, but cannot be encoded as a simple binary tree as discussed here. Some of these are the result of running such a description, but the components interact to create more complex behavior. These aren't really an issue, as their precursor can be described, which should suffice. However, others are more complicated. These either are a flotilla in which a sparker is perturbed by another spaceship, or a spaceship who's non-period-one components include configurations that don't arise naturally from the interaction of the period one parts.
By way of example of all those complications, take a look at:

Code: Select all

x = 18, y = 18, rule = 345/2/4
2.2A$2.2BA$2.2CBA$4.CB$5.CA$6.BA$5.ACBA$4.AB.CBA$3.ABCA.CBA$3.BC.B2.C
BA$2.AC.ACA2.CBA$2.B.AB.B3.CBA$.ACABC.CA3.CBA$.B2.C.B.B4.CBA$ACAC.3AC
5.CBA$B2.BAB9.CBA$CAC.A3C8.CB$.B5.B9.C!
which is what is left of the wick stretcher produced by the common enough evolution sequence I put on YouTube after the wick is trimmed.

This is "a spaceship who's non-period-one components include configurations that don't arise naturally from the interaction of the period one parts" where the alternating live cell in the 13th row (counting from one) needs to be there from formation or you get an alternation of two on, two off in those positions. In the configuration found, the core of rows 13-15 are p.2, row 16 is spontaneously p.4 and row 17 onwards is also spontaneously p.20 functioning as an effectively p.40 rear facing double shot gun, a limit case of "rakes or puffers".

Nearly two years on, I'm still trying to do something similar to what you've started here with 345/3/6 with primary focus on distinct mechanism by which emergent order accelerates the spread of chaotic core. The relatively little time I've given to Star Wars is because it seemed that any attempt at classification would require several lifetimes, particularly given the extreme resistance of many emergent Star Wars structures to assault by stuff moving at lightspeed. I see it's nearly a year already since I posted my early impressions to Wolfram's nowadays very quiet forum for A New Kind of Science:
I've been of the opinion for a while that (345/3/6) is comfortably beyond the threshold of emergent productivity that Wolfram's hypothesised fundamental rule needs. Star Wars ups that level considerably. It now seem weird that only 18 months ago I had no expectation that cellular automata would ever provide more than simplified demonstrations of emergent possibility. That has proven to be just plain wrong, although I'm still confident that, if there is a fundamental discrete mechanism at the bottom of the world we find ourselves in, it will not be a mechanism that can be efficiently represented as a CA.

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XOR Gates and Ticker Tape

Post by Karatorian » September 29th, 2010, 8:28 am

Interesting ship there you've got there. I think I've seen that one (or something very similar) before and took it apart. I didn't get to the point of analyzing it as deeply as you did, but I was rather disappointed that the rake doesn't arise spontaneously from the p1 configuration. Of course, there was no real reason to expect that it would, but it did show that what I was working on was woefully incomplete.

And now for something completely different...

I've built a fully functional XOR gate. It's nothing spectacular; rather, it's built from four NAND gates in the usual configuration. It uses p24 guns for the NOT portion of the NAND gates, and so runs on a p24 clock. The NAND gates are a slight modification of the one posted by Ajax. (I had to make the AND portion wider as I wasn't able to find a way to align the input streams as closely as his version requires. Does anyone know of a way?) The gate is not particularly fast. The propagation delays total to 12 clock cycles, which is 288 ticks. (You can actually get at the output slightly before then, but a round number of clocks is probably more useful.)

The trickiest part of building this was synchronizing the timing of everything. The delay lines on the right and left sides of the gate are an interesting construct in and of themselves. It might have been easier to construct if I'd have built a version of the duplicator that synchronizes it's outputs. Whether such a pattern would have improved the gate overall is hard to say.

Code: Select all

#N XOR Gate built from four NAND Gates
#O Levi Aho - September 2010
#C Version 1
#C Runs on a period 24 clock with a 12 cycle propagation delay (288 ticks)
x = 169, y = 216, rule = 345/2/4
38.2C12.2C$38.2B12.2B$38.2A12.2B22$38.2C12.2C$38.2B12.2B$38.2B12.2B
22$38.2C12.2C$38.2B12.2B$38.2B12.2A22$38.2C12.2C$38.2B12.2B$38.2A12.
2A22$38.2C12.2C$7.A30.2B12.2B43.A$6.3A29.2A12.2B42.3A$7.A89.A$42.A6.A
$11.A26.A2.3A4.3A2.A39.A$10.3A24.3A.2A6.2A.3A37.3A$11.A26.A3.A6.A3.A
39.A$41.3A4.3A$42.A6.A4$31.A2.A2.A16.A2.A2.A$30.9A14.9A$20.A10.A5.A
16.A5.A10.A$19.3A9.A5.A16.A5.A9.3A$20.A9.2A5.2A14.2A5.2A9.A$.A2.A2.A
2.A20.A4.2A16.2A4.A33.A2.A2.A2.A$12A12.A6.A3.2A18.2A3.A6.A25.12A$.A2.
A2.A2.A12.3A4.6A20.6A4.3A25.A2.A2.A2.A$24.A6.A2.A22.A2.A6.A4$2.A2.A2.
A2.A81.A2.A2.A2.A$.12A13.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A8.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A26.12A$2.A
2.A2.A2.A13.18A6.18A26.A2.A2.A2.A$26.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A8.A2.A2.A2.A2.A
2.A4$.A2.A2.A2.A83.A2.A2.A2.A$12A29.A8.A42.12A$.A2.A2.A2.A29.12A42.A
2.A2.A2.A$41.A2.A2.A2.A3$2.A2.A2.A2.A$.12A$2.A2.A2.A2.A11.A2.A26.A2.A
$22.6A24.6A$23.A2.A26.2A.A$23.2A.A$23.A.2A3.A7.A8.CBA4.A$24.A.4AB6.3A
7.CBA3.3A6.A2.A$24.3A2.AC7.A15.A6.6A$23.C.A.3A32.A3.2A$26.A2.3A30.A4.
2A$25.C4A.B29.2A5.2A$25.B.A2.C31.A5.A$27.BCB23.A8.A5.A$18.A9.A23.3A6.
9A21.A$17.3A33.A8.A2.A2.A21.3A$18.A72.A2$22.A64.A$21.3A29.A14.A17.3A$
22.A29.3A12.3A17.A$53.A14.A2$57.A6.A$.A2.A2.A2.A45.3A4.3A27.A2.A2.A2.
A$12A45.A6.A27.12A$.A2.A2.A2.A82.A2.A2.A2.A4$2.A2.A2.A2.A82.A2.A2.A2.
A$.12A80.12A$2.A2.A2.A2.A30.A2.A18.A2.A26.A2.A2.A2.A$41.5A.A14.A.5A$
42.A.A.2A14.2A.A.A$42.A2.A.2A2.C6.C2.2A.A2.A$7.A2.A30.7A.2A8.2A.7A$6.
6A30.A3.A.A.2AC4.C2A.A.A3.A$7.A2.A35.A.A.A2.B2.B2.A.A.A$46.C5AC4.C5AC
$45.B.B.A10.A.B.B$46.C2.BC8.CB2.C4$45.BC16.CB$44.AC18.CA$44.B.A.C12.C
.A.B$44.4AB12.B4A$39.A6.A.A12.A.A6.A$6.A31.3A28.3A32.A$5.3A31.A30.A
32.3A$6.A32.A30.A33.A$39.2A28.2A$2.A36.A30.A37.A$.3A35.A30.A36.3A$2.A
36.2A28.2A37.A$39.A30.A$22.A16.A30.A16.A$21.3A14.3A6.A2.A8.A2.A6.3A
14.3A$22.A16.A6.6A6.6A6.A16.A$47.A2.A8.A2.A$18.A72.A$17.3A70.3A$18.A
72.A$50.CB6.BC$37.B10.C.A8.A.C$36.C.C9.B12AB$34.C.A.A9.A.A2.A2.A2.A.A
$35.4A.C$35.A2.2AB$34.A.3A7.CBA$32.4A2.AB7.A$33.A.3AC.C3.C.3A$31.2A.
2A3.B4.BC.A$32.2A.A9.ABA$32.A2.A$31.6A33.A23.A23.A23.A23.A$32.A2.A33.
3A21.3A21.3A21.3A21.3A$68.2A.2A19.2A.2A19.2A.2A19.2A.2A19.2A.2A$69.3A
21.3A21.3A21.3A21.3A$70.A23.A23.A23.A23.A!
The pattern includes a simple example of the gate in action. At the top of the gate are two p24 input streams. Some of the gliders in these streams have been ghosted to provide various combinations to the gate. The diamond type shapes at the bottom right provide a primitive means of reading the output. At tick 288, the first output will be centered over the leftmost diamond. At each clock cycle, the previous output will move to the right and be centered over the next diamond, while the latest output appears over the leftmost one.

A simple way to view the gate's output is to set your step to 24 and then hit tab to advance one clock at a time. However, to see the gate in action, it's better to let it free run with a small delay.

I still hope to find a simpler way of building an XOR gate. Ideally, we can find something non-periodic, which would enable more flexibility in circuit construction. Theoretically, only gates which output a one when there are no ones in the input need to be clocked. If one could construct stable versions of the rest of the gates, it would allow for a standard set of building blocks which could be paired with NOT gates (guns) of various periods (as long as they're not too fast).

After completing this I began thinking about Extrementhusiast's idea for a cross based XOR gate. It occurred to me that the "sick array of reflectors" that Axaj mentioned as being required to make it work would be functionally equivalent to an OR gate. (Well, approximately. The reflector array actually has no need to handle inputs which are both one. So an XOR would also work (but of course, that's a catch twenty-two), or several other gates, including those that explode on all ones).

There are two existing methods to build an OR gate, so this should be relatively easy. It should also be smaller and faster than the four NAND gate implementation. One OR gate is 173ben's NOT and AND gate based implementation. The other would be to couple Axaj's NOR gate with a NOT gate.

I was going to use this XOR gate to build an adder, but now that I've got ideas for better ones, I'm going to work on them first.

EDIT 1

Using the cross reaction and an OR gate, I built a much smaller and faster XOR gate.

Here's the OR gate, it's based on a NOR gate and a NOT gate. It has a propagation delay of only one cycle! However, that's expecting the input pretty tight into the gate, so with routing, most usages are more likely to be slower.

Code: Select all

#N OR Gate built from a NOR Gate and a NOT Gate
#O Levi Aho - September 2010
#C Based on an NOR Gate by "Axaj"
#C Version 1
#C Runs on a period 24 clock with a 1 cycle propagation delay (24 ticks)
x = 212, y = 43, rule = 345/2/4
89.A23.A23.A23.A23.A23.A$88.BCB21.3A21.3A21.3A21.3A21.3A$86.B.A2.C19.
2A.2A19.2A.2A19.2A.2A19.2A.2A19.2A.2A$86.C4A.B19.3A21.3A21.3A21.3A21.
3A$87.A2.3A20.A23.A23.A23.A23.A$84.C.A.3A$85.3A2.3A6.A$85.A.2AB.BA5.
3A$84.A.2A.AC8.A$84.2A.A$84.A2.A$83.6A$84.A2.A3$CBA21.C2B21.C2B21.CBA
21.CBA13.A$CBA21.C2B21.C2B21.CBA21.CBA12.3A$112.A$112.A$6.CBA21.CBA
21.C2B21.C2B21.CBA7.2A$6.CBA21.CBA21.C2B21.C2B21.CBA7.A$106.2A4.A$
106.2B3.3A$106.2C4.A2$105.A.A$105.B3A$105.C.A$106.BA5$110.C$108.C.A.A
$108.4AB$109.A.A.AC$103.A3.A.A.2A$102.7A.2A$103.A2.A.2A.A$103.A.A.2A$
102.5A.BA$103.A2.B!
And here's the XOR gate. It's simply the result of routing the output of the XOR cross reaction discussed earlier into the OR gate. It has a propagation delay of 3 cycles (72 ticks).

Code: Select all

#N XOR Gate built from a Cross and an OR Gate
#O Levi Aho - September 2010
#C Based on an NOR Gate by "Axaj" and a reaction found by "Extrementhusiast"
#C Version 1
#C Runs on a period 24 clock with a 3 cycle propagation delay (72 ticks)
x = 236, y = 128, rule = 345/2/4
113.A23.A23.A23.A23.A23.A$112.BCB21.3A21.3A21.3A21.3A21.3A$110.B.A2.C
19.2A.2A19.2A.2A19.2A.2A19.2A.2A19.2A.2A$110.C4A.B19.3A21.3A21.3A21.
3A21.3A$111.A2.3A20.A23.A23.A23.A23.A$108.C.A.3A$109.3A2.3A6.A$109.A.
2AB.BA5.3A$108.A.2A.AC8.A$108.2A.A$99.A8.A2.A$98.3A6.6A$99.A8.A2.A2$
103.A$102.3A31.A$103.A31.3A$136.A$136.A$116.A19.2A$C2B21.C2B21.CBA21.
CBA21.C2B16.3A18.A$C2B21.C2B21.CBA21.CBA21.C2B5.A11.A13.2A4.A$103.3A
10.A13.2B3.3A$104.A5.A4.3A12.2C4.A$109.3A4.A$110.A5.A12.A.A$110.A4.3A
11.B3A$109.3A4.A12.C.A$110.A19.BA$105.2A$105.2B$105.2C2$134.C$132.C.A
.A$132.4AB$133.A.A.AC$127.A3.A.A.2A$126.7A.2A$127.A2.A.2A.A$127.A.A.
2A$126.5A.BA$127.A2.B11$105.2A$105.2B$105.2C22$105.2B$105.2B$105.2C
22$105.2B$105.2B$105.2C22$105.2A$105.2B$105.2C!
Both gates include example input like the previous gate. Enjoy.

I still hold out hope that a stable OR or XOR gate can be found. (A stable OR would allow for a fairly small stable XOR.)

EDIT 2

I made a memory loop and rather than do anything useful with it, I decided to make a ticker. (Inspired by the Golly demo, of course.)

Code: Select all

#N Starwars Ticker
#O Levi Aho - September 2010
#C Version 1
#C A ticker tape style display based on memory loops.
#C Inspired by the Golly ticker demo.
x = 1629, y = 267, rule = 345/2/4
1505.CBA$1486.A19.A$1485.3A15.C.3A$1486.A19.A.A$1501.B2C2.2B$1490.A9.
A.A.B.CA$1489.3A9.4A30.CBA$1490.A11.A13.A19.A$1515.3A15.C.3A$1490.2A
24.A19.A.A6.ABA$1490.2B39.B2C2.2B7.CBC$1490.2C28.A9.A.A.B.CA$1519.3A
9.4A30.CBA$1520.A11.A13.A19.A$1545.3A15.C.3A$1520.2A24.A19.A.A$1520.
2B39.B2C2.2B$1520.2C28.A9.A.A.B.CA$1549.3ACBA6.4A30.CBA$1550.A.CBA7.A
13.A19.A$1575.3A15.C.3A$1550.2A24.A19.A.A$1550.2B39.B2C2.2B$1550.2C
28.A9.A.A.B.CA$1579.3A9.4A30.CBA$1580.A11.A13.A19.A$1605.3A15.C.3A$
1580.2A24.A19.A.A$1580.2B39.B2C2.2B$1580.2C28.A9.A.A.B.CA$1609.3A9.4A
$1610.A11.A2$1610.2A$1610.2B$1610.2C4$1531.2C$1531.2B$1531.2A4$1520.
2A39.2C$1520.2B39.2B$1520.2C39.2A$1501.2C$1501.2B$1501.2A$1550.2A39.
2C$1550.2B39.2B$1550.2C39.2A$1490.2A$1490.2B$1490.2C$1580.2A39.2C$
1580.2B39.2B$1580.2C39.2A4$1501.2C107.2A$1501.2B107.2B$1501.2A107.2C$
1550.2A$1550.2B$1550.2C$1531.2C$1531.2B$1531.2A4$1520.2A39.2C$1520.2B
39.2B$1520.2C39.2A$1610.2A$1610.2B$1610.2C$1591.2C$1591.2B$1591.2A4$
1621.2C$1621.2B$1621.2A7$1591.2C$1591.2B$1591.2A$1490.2A39.2C$1490.2B
39.2B$1490.2C39.2A4$1520.2A$1520.2B$1520.2C$1501.2C$1501.2B$1501.2A$
1591.2C$1591.2B$1591.2A$1490.2A$1490.2B$1490.2C$1580.2A39.2C$1580.2B
39.2B$1580.2C39.2A$1561.2C$1561.2B$1561.2A4$1550.2A$1550.2B$1550.2C$
1531.2C$1531.2B$1531.2A4$1520.2A39.2C$1520.2B39.2B$1520.2C39.2A$1610.
2A$1610.2B$1610.2C$1591.2C$1591.2B$1591.2A4$1621.2C$1621.2B$1621.2A4$
1501.2C107.2A$1501.2B107.2B$1501.2A107.2C4$1531.2C$1531.2B$1531.2A4$
1561.2C$1561.2B$1561.2A$1501.2C$1501.2B$1501.2A$1591.2C$1591.2B$1591.
2A$1490.2A$1490.2B$1490.2C$1621.2C$1621.2B$1621.2A$1561.2C$1561.2B$
1561.2A$1501.2C$1501.2B$1501.2A4$1490.2A$1490.2B$1490.2C$1580.2A$
1580.2B$1580.2C$1561.2C$1561.2B$1561.2A4$1550.2A39.2C$1550.2B39.2B$
1550.2C39.2A$1531.2C$1531.2B$1531.2A$1621.2C$1621.2B$1621.2A$1520.2A$
1520.2B$1520.2C$1501.2C107.2A$1501.2B107.2B$1501.2A107.2C7$1505.C$
1504.BA$1503.A.A.C$1501.A2.3AB$1490.A9.3A.2A.A$1489.3A9.A3.A$1490.A9.
CBA.3A$1505.A$1486.A48.A$1485.3A43.A2.3A54.2C$1486.A33.A9.3A.2A55.2B$
1494.A2.A2.A18.3A9.A3.A55.2A$1493.9A18.A13.3A28.C$1494.A5.A34.A28.BA$
1494.A5.A15.A46.A.A.C$1493.2A5.2A13.3A43.A2.3AB12.2A39.2C$1494.A4.2A
15.A33.A9.3A.2A.A12.2B39.2B$1494.A3.2A24.A2.A2.A18.3A9.A3.A14.2C39.2A
$.A1491.6A24.9A18.A9.CBA.3A$3A1491.A2.A26.A5.A34.A$.A1522.A5.A15.A48.
A$1523.2A5.2A13.3A43.A2.3A$1524.A4.2A15.A33.A9.3A.2A$1524.A3.2A24.A2.
A2.A18.3A9.A3.A$5.A1496.ABC18.6A24.9A18.A13.3A$4.3A1495.ABC19.A2.A26.
A5.A34.A$5.A1548.A5.A15.A48.A$1553.2A5.2A13.3A33.A9.A2.3A$1554.A4.2A
15.A33.A.B7.3A.2A$1554.A3.2A24.A2.A2.A18.3AC8.A3.A$.A1515.ABC33.6A24.
9A18.A13.3A$3A1514.ABC34.A2.A26.A5.A18.ABC13.A$.A1582.A5.A15.A$1583.
2A5.2A13.3A$1584.A4.2A15.A8.ABC$1584.A3.2A24.A2.A2.A$5.A1526.ABC42.AB
C3.6A24.9A$4.3A1525.ABC42.ABC4.A2.A26.A5.A$5.A1608.A5.A.C$1613.2A5.2A
B$1614.A4.2A.A$1614.A3.2A$.A1500.ABC12.ABC57.ABC33.6A$3A1499.ABC12.AB
C57.ABC34.A2.A$.A!
The memory loop is just some reflectors and a duplicator. As the memory loop output is already an orthogonal spaceship, all that was needed to build the ticker was a loops with the proper placement and data. Fairly easy stuff.

To get the data into the loops, I started with a number of p15 glider streams, which I edited to create the text. Then I took each stream and loaded it into a memory loop. I loaded the streams by removing the half of the duplicator and the lower left reflector. This allowed me to run a stream into the loop. Then I put the missing pieces back. (It helps that I have two zeros at the ends of the streams, otherwise it would've been slightly trickier.)

knightlife
Posts: 566
Joined: May 31st, 2009, 12:08 am

Re: Star Wars Rule

Post by knightlife » October 2nd, 2010, 3:01 pm

This small backrake produces spaceships bigger than itself :o

Code: Select all

x = 7, y = 8, rule = 345/2/4
CBA$2.CBA$.C.A.A$.ABC3A$.ABC3A$.C.A.A$2.CBA$CBA!
Extensible spaceships:

Code: Select all

x = 164, y = 59, rule = 345/2/4
6.A2.BC.A$2.C.AB2A.A.AB2A$C2.BAC.3A.AB2A$.BAC.2A2.A2.A$.C.2CA2B.2A.2A
$.C3.AC2.A2.A$2.C.C.B3.A2B2A$4.C2A3.A2B2A$.B4.A2.A2.A$2C4.2A.2A.2A$.B
4.A2.A2.A$4.C2A3.A2B2A$2.C.C.B3.A2B2A$2.B2.AC2.A2.A$.2A2C.2B.2A.2A$2.
B2.AC2.A2.A$2.C.C.B3.A2B2A$4.C2A3.A2B2A$.B4.A2.A2.A$2C4.2A.2A.2A$.B4.
A2.A2.A$4.C2A3.A2B2A46.A3.B3.C11.A3.B3.C11.A$2.C.C.B3.A2B2A36.A.CA.AC
A.B.B.C.C2.A3.B2.ACA.B.B.C.C2.A3.B2.ACA.B.B$2.B2.AC2.A2.A34.A.CB.B.2A
B.B2A.3A.3A.3A.3A.3A.3A.3A.3A.3A.3AC3A$.2A2C.2B.2A.2A33.B2AB.3A.A.C.
3A.3A.3A.3A.3A.3A.3A.3A.3A.3A.5A$2.B2.AC2.A2.A35.A5.3A2.A3.B2.ACA.B.B
.C.C2.A3.B2.ACA.B.B.C.C2.A2.A27.B$2.C.C.B3.A2B2A32.CABC2.C2.ACBC11.A
3.B3.C11.A3.B3.C29.C.C$4.C2A3.A2B2A35.A2CB.ABABA68.B4.A.A3.B3.C11.A3.
B$.B4.A2.A2.A36.ABABA2.A.A70.C.AB.B.B.C.C2.A3.B2.ACA.B.B.C.C.A$2C4.2A
.2A.2A32.C2.C3.A78.ABA.3A.3A.3A.3A.3A.3A.4A$.B4.A2.A2.A36.ABABA2.A.A
72.CB.3A.3A.3A.3A.3A.3A.3AB2A$4.C2A3.A2B2A35.A2CB.ABABA71.A5.B2.ACA.B
.B.C.C2.A3.B2.A.A$2.C.C.B3.A2B2A32.CABC2.C2.ACBC11.A3.B3.C11.A3.B3.C
29.C.CBC11.A3.B3.C$2.B2.AC2.A2.A35.A5.3A2.A3.B2.ACA.B.B.C.C2.A3.B2.AC
A.B.B.C.C2.A2.A27.B.BA$.2A2C.2B.2A.2A33.B2AB.3A.A.C.3A.3A.3A.3A.3A.3A
.3A.3A.3A.3A.5A26.A$2.B2.AC2.A2.A34.A.CB.B.2AB.B2A.3A.3A.3A.3A.3A.3A.
3A.3A.3A.3AC3A$2.C.C.B3.A2B2A36.A.CA.ACA.B.B.C.C2.A3.B2.ACA.B.B.C.C2.
A3.B2.ACA.B.B$4.C2A3.A2B2A46.A3.B3.C11.A3.B3.C11.A$.B4.A2.A2.A$2C4.2A
.2A.2A$.B4.A2.A2.A$4.C2A3.A2B2A$2.C.C.B3.A2B2A$2.B2.AC2.A2.A$.2A2C.2B
.2A.2A$2.B2.AC2.A2.A$2.C.C.B3.A2B2A$4.C2A3.A2B2A$.B4.A2.A2.A$2C4.2A.
2A.2A$.B4.A2.A2.A$4.C2A3.A2B2A$2.C.C.B3.A2B2A$.C3.AC2.A2.A$.C.2CA2B.
2A.2A$.BAC.2A2.A2.A$C2.BAC.3A.AB2A$2.C.AB2A.A.AB2A$6.A2.BC.A!
The smallest (wickstretcher/fuse) may occur naturally in a soup because the wickstretcher does.

This is the first extensible width p1 wickstretcher I was able to engineer:

Code: Select all

x = 42, y = 129, rule = 345/2/4
13.CBA$13.CBA$11.CBA4.BA$17.C.CB5.CB$19.C.A4.B.C4.CBA$14.2A2.CAB2.ACA
CA.3A.CBA$13.CBA3.BC2AB.B.CBA.AB$15.4A2.A.C.2A2.2A.A$14.C.C.A.A.A.A.A
.A.A.A.A.A$15.2B21A$.A33.B.A$40A$.2A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.
A.A.A$.A2.2A2.2A2.2A2.2A2.2A2.2A2.2AB.2A3.AC3A$.4A.3A.3A.3A.3A.3A.3A
3.A.A2.B4A$.A.A.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A.BA2.A$.A.32A.C$.2A3.A3.A3.A3.A
3.A3.A3.A3.A.BA$.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A$.A.37A$.2A.A.A
.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A$.A2.2A2.2A2.2A2.2A2.2A2.2A2.2AB.2A
3.AC3A$.4A.3A.3A.3A.3A.3A.3A3.A.A2.B4A$.A.A.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A.BA
2.A$.A.32A.C$.2A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A.BA$.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.
A.A.A.A.A.A.A$.A.37A$.2A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A$.A2.2A
2.2A2.2A2.2A2.2A2.2A2.2AB.2A3.AC3A$.4A.3A.3A.3A.3A.3A.3A3.A.A2.B4A$.A
.A.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A.BA2.A$.A.32A.C$.2A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A.
BA$.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A$.A.37A$.2A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.
A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A$.A2.2A2.2A2.2A2.2A2.2A2.2A2.2AB.2A3.AC3A$.4A.3A
.3A.3A.3A.3A.3A3.A.A2.B4A$.A.A.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A.BA2.A$.A.32A.C$
.2A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A.BA$.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A
$.A.37A$.2A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A$.A2.2A2.2A2.2A2.2A
2.2A2.2A2.2AB.2A3.AC3A$.4A.3A.3A.3A.3A.3A.3A3.A.A2.B4A$.A.A.A3.A3.A3.
A3.A3.A3.A3.A.BA2.A$.A.32A.C$.2A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A.BA$.A.A.A.A.
A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A$.A.37A$.2A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.
A.A.A.A.A$.A2.2A2.2A2.2A2.2A2.2A2.2A2.2AB.2A3.AC3A$.4A.3A.3A.3A.3A.3A
.3A3.A.A2.B4A$.A.A.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A.BA2.A$.A.32A.C$.2A3.A3.A3.A
3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A.BA$.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A$.A.37A$.2A.
A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A$.A3.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.
A2.A.2C3A$.3A.4A2.4A2.4A2.4A2.4A2.2ABC3A$.A.2A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.
A2.A2.A2.A2.A$.A2.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A$.2A.A2.A2.A2.A
2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A$.A.A.4A2.4A2.4A2.4A2.4A2.2ABC3A$.A.A.A2.A
2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A.2C3A$.2A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.
A.A.A$.A.37A$.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A$.2A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.
A3.A3.A3.A.BA$.A.32A.C$.A.A.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A.BA2.A$.4A.3A.3A.3A
.3A.3A.3A3.A.A2.B4A$.A2.2A2.2A2.2A2.2A2.2A2.2A2.2AB.2A3.AC3A$.2A.A.A.
A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A$.A.37A$.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A
.A.A.A.A.A$.2A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A.BA$.A.32A.C$.A.A.A3.A3.A3.A3.A
3.A3.A3.A.BA2.A$.4A.3A.3A.3A.3A.3A.3A3.A.A2.B4A$.A2.2A2.2A2.2A2.2A2.
2A2.2A2.2AB.2A3.AC3A$.2A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A$.A.37A
$.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A$.2A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A.B
A$.A.32A.C$.A.A.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A.BA2.A$.4A.3A.3A.3A.3A.3A.3A3.A
.A2.B4A$.A2.2A2.2A2.2A2.2A2.2A2.2A2.2AB.2A3.AC3A$.2A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.
A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A$.A.37A$.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A$.
2A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A.BA$.A.32A.C$.A.A.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A.BA
2.A$.4A.3A.3A.3A.3A.3A.3A3.A.A2.B4A$.A2.2A2.2A2.2A2.2A2.2A2.2A2.2AB.
2A3.AC3A$.2A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A$.A.37A$.A.A.A.A.A.
A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A$.2A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A.BA$.A.32A.C$.
A.A.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A.BA2.A$.4A.3A.3A.3A.3A.3A.3A3.A.A2.B4A$.A2.
2A2.2A2.2A2.2A2.2A2.2A2.2AB.2A3.AC3A$.2A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.
A.A.A.A.A$.A.37A$.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A$.2A3.A3.A3.A
3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A.BA$.A.32A.C$.A.A.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A.BA2.A$.4A.3A.
3A.3A.3A.3A.3A3.A.A2.B4A$.A2.2A2.2A2.2A2.2A2.2A2.2A2.2AB.2A3.AC3A$.2A
.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A$40A$.A33.B.A$15.2B21A$14.C.C.A
.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A$15.4A2.A.C.2A2.2A.A$13.CBA3.BC2AB.B.CBA.AB$14.2A2.
CAB2.ACACA.3A.CBA$19.C.A4.B.C4.CBA$17.C.CB5.CB$11.CBA4.BA$13.CBA$13.C
BA!
But then I built this one from the center section of the first, which forms very cleanly:

Code: Select all

x = 57, y = 78, rule = 345/2/4
53.CBA$53.CBA$.A$57A$.2A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A
2.A2.4A$.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A$.2A.
2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A$.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A
2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A$.2A2.4A2.4A2.4A2.4A2.4A2.4A2.
4A2.4AC.4A$.2A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.AB.AB2A$
.A2.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A$.54A$.A.A.A.A
.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A$.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A
.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A$.54A$.A2.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A
.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A$.2A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.
A2.A2.AB.AB2A$.2A2.4A2.4A2.4A2.4A2.4A2.4A2.4A2.4AC.4A$.A2.A2.A2.A2.A
2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A$.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.
2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A$.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A
2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A$.2A2.4A2.4A2.4A2.4A2.4A2.4A2.4A2.4AC.4A$.2A2.A2.A
2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.AB.AB2A$.A2.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.
A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A$.54A$.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A
.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A$.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A
.A.A.A.A.A.A$.54A$.A2.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A
.A.A$.2A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.AB.AB2A$.2A2.
4A2.4A2.4A2.4A2.4A2.4A2.4A2.4AC.4A$.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.
A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A$.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.
2A.2A.2A$.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A$.2A
2.4A2.4A2.4A2.4A2.4A2.4A2.4A2.4AC.4A$.2A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.
A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.AB.AB2A$.A2.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A
.A.A.A.A.A.A$.54A$.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.
A.A$.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A$.54A$.A2.A
.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A$.2A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A
2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.AB.AB2A$.2A2.4A2.4A2.4A2.4A2.4A2.4A2.
4A2.4AC.4A$.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A$.
2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A$.A2.A2.A2.A2.A
2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A$.2A2.4A2.4A2.4A2.4A2.4A2.
4A2.4A2.4AC.4A$.2A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.AB.A
B2A$.A2.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A$.54A$.A.A
.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A$.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A
.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A$.54A$.A2.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A
.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A$.2A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A
2.A2.A2.A2.AB.AB2A$.2A2.4A2.4A2.4A2.4A2.4A2.4A2.4A2.4AC.4A$.A2.A2.A2.
A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A$.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.
2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A$.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A
2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A$.2A2.4A2.4A2.4A2.4A2.4A2.4A2.4A2.4AC.4A$.2A2.A
2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.AB.AB2A$.A2.A.A.A.A.A.A.A
.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A$.54A$.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.
A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A$.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.
A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A$.54A$.A2.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.
A.A.A.A$.2A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.AB.AB2A$.2A
2.4A2.4A2.4A2.4A2.4A2.4A2.4A2.4AC.4A$.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A
2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A$.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.2A.
2A.2A.2A.2A$.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A$
.2A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.A2.4A$57A$.A$53.CBA
$53.CBA!
Small precursor for a "Star Wars fighter":

Code: Select all

x = 9, y = 29, rule = 345/2/4
.A$.A2$A2$A2$.A$.A2$8.A$8.A2$7.A2$7.A2$8.A$8.A2$.A$.A2$A2$A2$.A$.A!
EDIT:
A p2 spaceship and derived p4 and p8 spaceships that are extensible in two dimensions:

Code: Select all

x = 80, y = 216, rule = 345/2/4
75.CBA$5.CBA67.CBA$5.C.A$5.C.AB70A$5.C.AB70A$5.C.A$5.CBA67.CBA$75.CBA
31$23.CBA49.CBA$7.CBA13.CBA15.CBA31.CBA$8.B.A31.B.A$8.BC17A15.BC35A$
7.ABC17A14.ABC35A$3.AB.CAC2A26.AB.CAC2A$4.BCBA15.CBA12.BCBA33.CBA$4.B
CBA15.CBA12.BCBA33.CBA$3.AB.CAC2A26.AB.CAC2A$7.ABC17A14.ABC35A$8.BC
17A15.BC35A$8.B.A31.B.A$7.CBA13.CBA15.CBA31.CBA$23.CBA49.CBA17$23.CBA
49.CBA$7.CBA13.CBA15.CBA31.CBA$8.B.A31.B.A$8.BC17A15.BC35A$7.ABC17A
14.ABC35A$3.AB.CAC2A26.AB.CAC2A$4.BCBA15.CBA12.BCBA33.CBA$4.BCBA15.CB
A12.BCBA33.CBA$3.AB.CAC2A26.AB.CAC2A$7.ABC17A14.ABC35A$7.ABC17A14.ABC
35A$3.AB.CAC2A26.AB.CAC2A$4.BCBA15.CBA12.BCBA33.CBA$4.BCBA15.CBA12.BC
BA33.CBA$3.AB.CAC2A26.AB.CAC2A$7.ABC17A14.ABC35A$8.BC17A15.BC35A$8.B.
A31.B.A$7.CBA13.CBA15.CBA31.CBA$23.CBA49.CBA14$23.CBA49.CBA$7.CBA13.C
BA15.CBA31.CBA$8.B.A31.B.A$8.BC17A15.BC35A$7.ABC17A14.ABC35A$3.AB.CAC
2A26.AB.CAC2A$4.BCBA15.CBA12.BCBA33.CBA$4.BCBA15.CBA12.BCBA33.CBA$3.A
B.CAC2A26.AB.CAC2A$7.ABC17A14.ABC35A$7.ABC17A14.ABC35A$3.AB.CAC2A26.A
B.CAC2A$4.BCBA15.CBA12.BCBA33.CBA$4.BCBA15.CBA12.BCBA33.CBA$3.AB.CAC
2A26.AB.CAC2A$7.ABC17A14.ABC35A$7.ABC17A14.ABC35A$3.AB.CAC2A26.AB.CAC
2A$4.BCBA15.CBA12.BCBA33.CBA$4.BCBA15.CBA12.BCBA33.CBA$3.AB.CAC2A26.A
B.CAC2A$7.ABC17A14.ABC35A$8.BC17A15.BC35A$8.B.A31.B.A$7.CBA13.CBA15.C
BA31.CBA$23.CBA49.CBA16$76.CBA$5.CBA68.CBA$5.C.A$5.C.AB71A$5.C.AB71A$
4.C.2A$3.ACB.A68.CBA$2.B.B2.A68.CBA$.A2CB.BA$ABA.AC.AB71A$.BCABC.AB
71A$BC2.B.BA$.C.CB.2A68.CBA$.C.CB.2A68.CBA$BC2.B.BA$.BCABC.AB71A$ABA.
AC.AB71A$.A2CB.BA$2.B.B2.A68.CBA$3.ACB.A68.CBA$4.C.2A$5.C.AB71A$3.ABC
.AB71A$BC2.B.BA$.C.CB.2A68.CBA$.C.CB.2A68.CBA$BC2.B.BA$3.ABC.AB71A$5.
C.AB71A$4.C.2A$3.ACB.A68.CBA$2.B.B2.A68.CBA$.A2CB.BA$ABA.AC.AB71A$.BC
ABC.AB71A$BC2.B.BA$.C.CB.2A68.CBA$.C.CB.2A68.CBA$BC2.B.BA$.BCABC.AB
71A$ABA.AC.AB71A$.A2CB.BA$2.B.B2.A68.CBA$3.ACB.A68.CBA$4.C.2A$5.C.AB
71A$3.ABC.AB71A$BC2.B.BA$.C.CB.2A68.CBA$.C.CB.2A68.CBA$BC2.B.BA$3.ABC
.AB71A$5.C.AB71A$4.C.2A$3.ACB.A68.CBA$2.B.B2.A68.CBA$.A2CB.BA$ABA.AC.
AB71A$.BCABC.AB71A$BC2.B.BA$.C.CB.2A68.CBA$.C.CB.2A68.CBA$BC2.B.BA$.B
CABC.AB71A$ABA.AC.AB71A$.A2CB.BA$2.B.B2.A68.CBA$3.ACB.A68.CBA$4.C.2A$
5.C.AB71A$5.C.AB71A$5.C.A$5.CBA68.CBA$76.CBA!
EDIT2:
An 2D-extensible p2 spaceship, probably found already:

Code: Select all

x = 45, y = 26, rule = 345/2/4
38.CBA$21.CBA14.CBA$22.B.A$19.BC.AC18A$14.CBA3.CB20A$15.B.A$12.BC.AC
26A$7.CBA3.CB28A$8.B.A$5.BC.AC34A$CBA3.CB36A$.B.A$.BC42A$.BC42A$.B.A$
CBA3.CB36A$5.BC.AC34A$8.B.A$7.CBA3.CB28A$12.BC.AC26A$15.B.A$14.CBA3.C
B20A$19.BC.AC18A$22.B.A$21.CBA14.CBA$38.CBA!
A p6 version, should call it a greyship I guess:

Code: Select all

x = 46, y = 26, rule = 345/2/4
39.CBA$20.CBA16.CBA$21.B.A$14.BC2.BC.AC20A$15.C.A.CB22A$16.B.A$6.CBA
2.C.AB.AC26A$7.CBA3.CB29A$7.C.A$3.BC.AB.AB34A$.2C2A.CB37A$C.AB.A$3.BC
41A$3.BC41A$C.AB.A$.2C2A.CB37A$3.BC.AB.AB34A$7.C.A$7.CBA3.CB29A$6.CBA
2.C.AB.AC26A$16.B.A$15.C.A.CB22A$14.BC2.BC.AC20A$21.B.A$20.CBA16.CBA$
39.CBA!

knightlife
Posts: 566
Joined: May 31st, 2009, 12:08 am

Re: Star Wars Rule

Post by knightlife » October 6th, 2010, 5:11 am

Here is a stable XOR gate I created (no guns) that can handle p17 glider streams:

Code: Select all

x = 81, y = 136, rule = 345/2/4
3C5.C3.C.4C.4C5.4C$C.C6.C.C2.C2.C.C2.C6.C.C$3C7.C3.C2.C.4C6.3C$C.C6.C
.C2.C2.C.C.C7.C.C$C.C5.C3.C.4C.C.2C5.4C12$7.3C.4C6.3C31.3C2.C.3C4.C3.
C.C.C2.C$7.C.C2.C.C6.C33.C.C2.C3.C4.2C.2C.C.2C.C$7.3C2.3C6.C33.3C2.C
3.C4.C.C.C.C.C.2C$7.C.C2.C.C6.C33.C4.C3.C4.C3.C.C.C2.C$7.C.C.4C6.3C
31.C4.C3.C4.C3.C.C.C2.C4$7.3C2.3C6.3C$7.C.C2.C.C6.C.C$7.C.C2.C.C6.C.C
$7.C.C2.C.C6.C.C$7.3C2.3C6.3C34.CBA14.CBA$58.CBA14.CBA$7.3C3.C8.C$7.C
.C3.C8.C$7.C.C3.C8.C$7.C.C3.C8.C$7.3C3.C8.C2$8.C3.3C7.C$8.C3.C.C7.C$
8.C3.C.C7.C$8.C3.C.C7.C$8.C3.3C7.C2$8.C4.C7.3C$8.C4.C7.C.C$8.C4.C7.C.
C$8.C4.C7.C.C$8.C4.C7.3C30$51.A$50.3A$3C48.A$C.C48.A$3C48.2A$C.C47.2A
5.A2.A2.A2.A2.A$C.C46.2A5.15A$50.A4.2A12.A$50.A3.2A$49.6A$50.A2.A6.A
2.A2.A$CBA14.CBA14.CB23.9A$CBA14.CBA14.CBA23.A5.A$60.A5.A10.3C$59.2A
5.2A9.C$51.A8.2A4.A10.C$50.3A8.2A3.A10.C$51.A10.6A9.3C$63.A2.A4$46.2A
$46.2B$46.2C15$46.A$46.2B$46.2C14$38.4C$39.C.C4.2A$39.3C4.2B$39.C.C4.
2C$38.4C!
Here is a stable OR gate (merge), definitely the hardest to make because of the output timing.
I show three separate gates to demonstrate how the outputs all appear at the same time:

Code: Select all

x = 152, y = 102, rule = 345/2/4
14.3C5.4C.4C5.4C$14.C.C5.C2.C.C2.C6.C.C$14.3C5.C2.C.4C6.3C$14.C.C5.C
2.C.C.C7.C.C$14.C.C5.4C.C.2C5.4C5$137.A2.A$136.6A$137.A2.A$137.A2.A$
136.5A3.A2.A$137.A2.A2.6A$137.A2.A3.A3.2A$18.3C.4C6.3C29.3C2.3C.3C4.C
3.C.C.C2.C4.4C.3C.C3.C.3C22.5A3.A4.2A$18.C.C2.C.C6.C31.C.C2.C3.C.C4.
2C.2C.C.2C.C5.C.C.C3.2C.2C.C.C23.A2.A2.2A5.2A$18.3C2.3C6.C31.3C2.3C.C
.C4.C.C.C.C.C.2C5.C.C.2C2.C.C.C.C.C23.A2.A3.A5.A$18.C.C2.C.C6.C31.C6.
C.C.C4.C3.C.C.C2.C5.C.C.C3.C.C.C.C.C22.5A3.A5.A$18.C.C.4C6.3C29.C4.3C
.3C4.C3.C.C.C2.C4.4C.3C.C3.C.3C23.A2.A2.9A$137.A2.A3.A2.A2.A$136.5A$
130.A6.A2.A$18.3C2.3C6.3C94.3A5.A2.A$18.C.C2.C.C6.C.C95.A5.6A4.3C$18.
C.C2.C.C6.C.C102.A2.A5.C$18.C.C2.C.C6.C.C111.C$18.3C2.3C6.3C37.CBA47.
CBA21.C$72.CBA47.CBA21.3C$18.3C3.C8.C$18.C.C3.C8.C$18.C.C3.C8.C87.3C$
18.C.C3.C8.C87.C.C$18.3C3.C8.C87.3C$121.C.C$19.C3.3C7.C87.C.C$19.C3.C
.C7.C$19.C3.C.C7.C$19.C3.C.C7.C101.A$19.C3.3C7.C94.4C2.2B$129.C.C2.2C
$19.C4.C8.C95.3C$19.C4.C8.C95.C.C$19.C4.C8.C94.4C$19.C4.C8.C$19.C4.C
8.C20$16.A2.A36.A2.A36.A2.A$15.6A34.6A34.6A$16.A2.A36.A2.A36.A2.A$16.
A2.A36.A2.A36.A2.A$15.5A3.A2.A28.5A3.A2.A28.5A3.A2.A$16.A2.A2.6A28.A
2.A2.6A28.A2.A2.6A$16.A2.A3.A3.2A27.A2.A3.A3.2A27.A2.A3.A3.2A$15.5A3.
A4.2A25.5A3.A4.2A25.5A3.A4.2A$16.A2.A2.2A5.2A25.A2.A2.2A5.2A25.A2.A2.
2A5.2A$16.A2.A3.A5.A26.A2.A3.A5.A26.A2.A3.A5.A$15.5A3.A5.A25.5A3.A5.A
25.5A3.A5.A$16.A2.A2.9A25.A2.A2.9A25.A2.A2.9A$16.A2.A3.A2.A2.A26.A2.A
3.A2.A2.A26.A2.A3.A2.A2.A$15.5A35.5A35.5A$9.A6.A2.A29.A6.A2.A29.A6.A
2.A$8.3A5.A2.A28.3A5.A2.A28.3A5.A2.A$9.A5.6A4.3C21.A5.6A4.3C21.A5.6A
4.3C$16.A2.A5.C30.A2.A5.C30.A2.A5.C$25.C39.C39.C$.CB22.C15.CBA21.C15.
CBA21.C$.CBA21.3C13.CBA21.3C13.CBA21.3C3$3C37.3C37.3C$C.C37.C.C37.C.C
$3C37.3C37.3C$C.C37.C.C37.C.C$C.C37.C.C37.C.C3$13.2A39.A38.2A$7.4C2.
2B32.4C2.2B32.4C2.2B$8.C.C2.2C33.C.C2.2C33.C.C2.2C$8.3C37.3C37.3C$8.C
.C37.C.C37.C.C$7.4C36.4C36.4C!
Unfortunately the OR gate has stray electrons that take a while to disappear, slowing the recovery time.
The demo shows the worst case, and that is the reason the OR gate can handle only p50 glider spacing or higher.

In the case of the XOR gate, I was able to improve the recovery time by adding a diagonal kink to the vertical track on the left side of the gate.
That kink will kill any stray electrons that reach it.

The small reflector used by axaj and others is also a compact splitter!

Code: Select all

x = 17, y = 9, rule = 345/2/4
CBA$CBA2$15.A$11.A2.3A$10.3A.2A$11.A3.A$14.3A$15.A!
The second glider has about a 30 tic delay from the first.

137ben
Posts: 343
Joined: June 18th, 2010, 8:18 pm

Re: Star Wars Rule

Post by 137ben » October 6th, 2010, 8:21 am

The small reflector used by axaj and others is also a compact splitter!
A stable splitter was already found (two were, in fact).

Code: Select all

x = 71, y = 22, rule = 345/2/4
3$8.A2.A$7.6A30.CBA2.A2.A$8.A3.2A29.CBA.6A$3.CBA2.A4.2A33.A3.2A$3.CBA
.2A5.2A32.A4.2A$8.A5.A32.2A5.2A$8.A5.A33.A5.A$7.9A32.A5.A$8.A2.A2.A
32.9A$48.A2.A2.A!
Yours is more compact, but the previous splitters have less offset between outputs. The offset can easily be negated with the "delayer" reaction mentioned earlier in this thread, but that slows it down and makes it less compact.

Awesomeness
Posts: 126
Joined: April 5th, 2009, 7:30 am

Re: Star Wars Rule

Post by Awesomeness » October 6th, 2010, 9:03 pm

Wow! Complex signal circuitry is possible in Star Wars! Do you think it would be easier than WireWorld in some aspects because of having not only signals but gliders as well? Perhaps a universal constructor could be built!

By the way, a few objects:

Code: Select all

x = 303, y = 257, rule = 345/2/4
162.4C.C2.C.C2.C$162.C4.C2.C.2C.C$162.C4.C2.C.2C.C$162.C.2C.C2.C.C.2C
$162.C2.C.C2.C.C.2C$162.4C.4C.C2.C9$216.C.A$164.A51.B3A$163.3A41.A8.A
.A.A$164.A41.3A8.2AB$207.A8.B2C$215.AC$215.B$214.AC.CB$214.B.2A$160.A
52.A.2A.A.B$159.3A41.CBA7.AB.4AC$160.A44.CBA3.ABC.A.A.A$160.A44.CBA3.
ABC.A.A.A$159.3A41.CBA7.AB.4AC$142.A17.A52.A.2A.A.B$141.3A70.B.2A$
142.A71.AC.CB$141.ABC71.B$215.AC$207.A8.B2C$164.A41.3A8.2AB$163.3A41.
A8.A.A.A$164.A51.B3A$216.C.A29$165.4C.3C.3C.3C.3C2.4C.C2.C.3C$165.C2.
C.C3.C4.C2.C2.C.C4.2C.C2.C$165.C2.C.C3.C4.C2.C2.C.2C3.2C.C2.C$165.4C.
C3.C4.C2.C2.C.C4.C.2C2.C$165.C2.C.C3.C4.C2.C2.C.C4.C.2C2.C$165.C2.C.
3C.3C.3C.3C2.4C.C2.C2.C7$218.ABC$219.A$207.C.A8.3A$206.B.A.B8.A$206.
4AC$208.A$218.2A$159.A57.A2B$158.3A57.AC$159.A53.ABC.2A$98.4C.4C3.4C.
C2.C94.A2.2A.A$98.C4.C2.C3.C4.C2.C50.ABC13.ABC13.ABC8.4A.4A$98.4C.4C
3.4C.4C40.ABC5.ABC5.ABC5.ABC5.ABC5.ABC5.ABC3.A2.A.A.A$101.C.C9.C.C2.C
40.ABC5.ABC5.ABC5.ABC5.ABC5.ABC5.ABC3.A2.A.A.A$101.C.C9.C.C2.C50.ABC
13.ABC13.ABC8.4A.4A$98.4C.C6.4C.C2.C94.A2.2A.A$159.A53.ABC.2A$158.3A
57.AC$159.A57.A2B$218.2A$116.ABC89.A$115.ABC88.4AC$113.ABC90.B.A.B8.A
$112.ABC92.C.A8.3A$110.ABC2.B103.A$108.ABC2.B2.C101.ABC$106.ABC2.BA.C
B.BA$104.ABC.ABC4.A.BC$103.ABC3.ABC3.ABC$102.ABC5.ABC.ABC3.C3.ABC132.
3C2.4C.4C.4C$102.ABC7.ABC2.B6.ABC132.C2.C.C2.C.C4.C$114.ABC.A3.A.A
134.3C2.C2.C.4C.2C$116.ABC.ABCB135.C2.C.4C4.C.C$118.ABC3.C134.C2.C.C
2.C4.C.C$120.ABC.AB133.3C2.C2.C.4C.4C$122.ABC7$298.B2C$297.AC$297.B$
107.A.CBA.C182.AC.CB$105.2ABA.CB2.B181.B.2A$105.2ABA.BA.C128.A52.A.2A
.A.B$107.A.A.C129.3A41.CBA7.AB.4AC$107.A.A.C130.A44.CBA3.ABC.A.A.A$
105.2ABA.BA.C128.A44.CBA3.ABC.A.A.A$105.2ABA.CB2.B126.3A41.CBA7.AB.4A
C$107.A.CBA.C128.A52.A.2A.A.B$296.B.2A$296.AC.CB$297.B$297.AC28$206.B
2C$75.4C.3C.C2.C.4C.3C$75.C2.C2.C2.C2.C.C4.C2.C$75.C2.C2.C2.4C.2C3.C
2.C$75.C2.C2.C2.C2.C.C4.3C$75.C2.C2.C2.C2.C.C4.C2.C$75.4C2.C2.C2.C.4C
.C2.C8$34.ABC$34.ABC$42.C$37.ABC3.B$36.ABC3.C$36.ABC$37.ABC$38.AB$39.
AC2.C$40.B2CB$40.A2BA$41.2A$40.C2.C$40.B2CB$25.2A13.A2BA$24.4A13.2A$
25.2A13.C2.C$24.B2CB12.B2CB$24.A2BA12.A2BA11.C$25.2A14.2A12.B$24.C2.C
12.C2.C11.AC2.C$24.B2CB12.B2CB12.B2CB$24.A2BA13.ABA12.A2BA$25.2A13.C
16.2A$24.C2.C10.C.C.C13.C2.C$24.B2CB11.BAB15.BCB$25.ABA12.A17.A2$22.A
$20.ABAB$9.2A7.ABC.C.C$8.3A.A3.ABC.AB.2A.ACAC$8.BC2ABA3.BC.6AB.AB3.CB
28.C8.CB53.C21.A$7.A.A.CBC.B2A2BC2.A3.2A.AC.C.A38.C19.ABA6.ABA42.BCB$
5.A2.2A4.C.C3.B2.A.2A.A.B4.BC.BC.CBA18.ABA2.ABC.ACA19.BC.CB.C2.BCACBA
18.ABA18.C3.C4.AB$4.A.A.A.A.A.A.A3.A.A.A.A3.A.A3.A.A.A.A5.A7.A5.A.A3.
A.A.A.A5.A7.A5.A.A3.A.A.A.A5.A7.A5.A.A3.A3.A3.A7.A.A5.A.C$2.156A.B$.A
.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.
A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A
.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.CA$3ACA.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.
A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A
.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A2.AB$3ACA.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A
.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.
A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.B.C$.
A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A
.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.
A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A6.A$2.196ABA$4.A.A.A.A.A
.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.
A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A
.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A$5.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.
A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A
.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.
A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.2A$5.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.
A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A
.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.
A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.2A$4.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.
A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A
.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.
A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.AB$2.196A$.A.A.A.A.A.A.C.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A
3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A
3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A7.A3.A3.A3.A3.A3.A.B.C$3ACA.CB.CA.3A.ABCAC.C3.C.
C.ABA163.A$3ACBA3.AB2A2.2A3.A8.2C$.A.A.C4.A.A2.2A.B3ABA5.B$2.ABC9.C.
2C.A.CA.C$15.4B.B.B$15.A2.2A.A.C9$109.ABC$109.ABC$102.2A7.ABC$102.2B
8.ABC$102.2C9.ABC4$102.2A$102.2BA$101.A2CB$101.B2.CA$100.AC3.B$99.AB
3.ACA$98.ABC3.B.B$97.ABC4.CAC$96.ABC$95.ABC7.C$95.BC!
The arbitrary-period gun and its variants were found in its original form as a predecessor to what you see in the area labelled "base".

Axaj
Posts: 232
Joined: September 26th, 2009, 12:23 am

Re: Star Wars Rule

Post by Axaj » October 6th, 2010, 9:53 pm

Since there is such a re-interest in this rule, I'm uploading my patterns that I have found for it. I've only skimmed through the thread, so I'm sure many of the things have been rediscovered here.
Attachments
Axaj-SW.zip
(20.6 KiB) Downloaded 223 times
Image

Karatorian
Posts: 21
Joined: September 18th, 2010, 10:56 am
Location: Rindge, NH, USA
Contact:

Re: Star Wars Rule

Post by Karatorian » October 9th, 2010, 8:54 am

Awesomeness wrote:Wow! Complex signal circuitry is possible in Star Wars! Do you think it would be easier than WireWorld in some aspects because of having not only signals but gliders as well? Perhaps a universal constructor could be built!
Yes and no. Having gliders gives the advantage of being able to cross paths without crossovers, however, in wireworld, the gates are much simpler. Ultimately, I think building complex creations in wireworld would be easier.

Given the technology we've got so far it's definitely possible to build a universal calculator (Turing machine, register machine, or other equivalent). However, it's not so clear about the constructor. I done a little bit of investigation into synthesis, but the results haven't been very encouraging.

Of the fourteen two glider collisions, ten are annihilations, three produce other small spaceships, and one is a quadratic. I've only done some basic toying around with collisions involving more gliders, but I haven't found anything really encouraging yet.

However, I'm working on a modified version of gencols that can use generations rules, so I should be able to be look into construction possibilities in more depth some time soon.

I discovered that the twin crosses reflector can also function as a duplicator and used it to build some four barreled guns. The guns can also be made larger with more barrels, which I'll leave as an exercise for the reader =_-

Code: Select all

x = 74, y = 42, rule = 345/2/4
24.CBA$24.CBA$34.A$33.3A$34.A2$38.A$37.3A$38.A12$15.C$14.B.A49.A$14.
4A40.C6.3A$.A14.A40.B.A6.A$3A54.4A$.A10.A46.A10.A$11.3A55.3A$5.A6.A
42.A14.A$4.3A47.3A$5.A49.A3$14.A57.A$13.3A55.3A$7.A6.A42.A14.A$6.3A
47.3A$7.A10.A38.A10.A$17.3A47.4A$3.A14.A42.A6.A.B$2.4A54.3A6.C$3.A.B
55.A$4.C!

137ben
Posts: 343
Joined: June 18th, 2010, 8:18 pm

Re: Star Wars Rule

Post by 137ben » October 9th, 2010, 12:25 pm

I had previously looked at 2 glider collisions. I think that complex patterns would require large numbers of gliders, more so than in life, because in life each glider is period four, whereas a starwars glider is p1. Thus, there are fewer ways for them to collide. But the existence of stable logic gates is very promising.

On a side note, we found several ways to construct arbitrarily high period oscillators, but what about arbitrarily high period spaceships?

Awesomeness
Posts: 126
Joined: April 5th, 2009, 7:30 am

Re: Star Wars Rule

Post by Awesomeness » October 11th, 2010, 7:35 pm

Using the extensible diamond technology this should be easily possible for both spaceships and puffers.

By the way, are there any known spacefillers in Star Wars? If not, a diamond configuration that emits an array of pluses or an extensible still life might be an example.

137ben
Posts: 343
Joined: June 18th, 2010, 8:18 pm

Re: Star Wars Rule

Post by 137ben » October 11th, 2010, 8:17 pm

@above: There is a quasi-spacefiller that covers only 1/4 of the plane:

Code: Select all

x = 25, y = 20, rule = 345/2/4
2$13.2A$12.A2BA$11.AB2CBA$10.ABC2.CB$9.ABC.2A.C$3.ABC2.ABC.A2BA$3.ABC
.ABC.AB2CBA$5.ABC.ABC3.A3.A$6.ABC.ABC8A$14.A.A.A.2A$14.2A.A.2A$14.2A.
A.2A$13.2A.A.A.2A$14.7A$15.A3.A!
Yes and no. Having gliders gives the advantage of being able to cross paths without crossovers, however, in wireworld, the gates are much simpler.
I'm not so sure about that. In wireworld, an and gate is substantially larger than the best starwars and gates. The not gates in both rules are similar sizes. On the other hand, or and xor gates are much better in wireworld. Signal splitters are also better in WW (though they are perfectly usable in starwars as well).
So you are quite possibly right. However, starwars still has the advantage of being able to expand its boundaries.

Awesomeness
Posts: 126
Joined: April 5th, 2009, 7:30 am

Re: Star Wars Rule

Post by Awesomeness » October 12th, 2010, 7:33 am

What I see in the future of construction in Star Wars is that spaceships other than the simple glider will be used to build objects such as still lifes. Construction of those spaceships might be difficult...

By the way, look at this:

Code: Select all

x = 6, y = 6, rule = 345/2/4
2.2A$.A2.A$A2.A.A$A4.A$.A2.A$2.2A!
And lastly 2 new spaceshis and 2 new backrakes, one firing the glider at the highest speed possible, (A first? It was engineered. Later I attached an interesting fuse for fun.) and one that fires a very unusual spaceship.

Code: Select all

x = 77, y = 82, rule = 345/2/4
15.B$13.AC.C.A$13.2B.4A$11.C2.A.AB2A$10.BC.ABC.A$16.B$2A14.BC.ABC.ABC
.ABC.ABC.ABC.ABC.A$2.ABC.ABC.ABC.ABC.ABC.ABC.ABC.ABC.ABC.ABC.AB2A$2.A
BC.ABC.ABC.ABC.ABC.ABC.ABC.ABC.ABC.ABC.AB2A$12.BC.ABC.ABC.ABC.ABC.ABC
.ABC.ABC.A$12.B$6.BC.ABC.A$7.C2.A.AB2A$9.2B.4A$9.AC.C.A$11.B38$45.CBA
$42.C.AB.A$45.BC3A$45.BC3A$42.C.AB.A$45.CBA16$18.CBA$18.CBA$15.C.BA$
17.CBA$10.BC5.AC.ABC.ABC.ABC.ABC.ABC.ABC.ABC.ABC.ABC.ABC.ABC.ABC.ABC.
AB.A$9.C.ABC.ABC.ABC.ABC.ABC.ABC.ABC.ABC.ABC.ABC.ABC.ABC.ABC.ABC.ABC.
ABC3A$9.B2.AB.ABC.ABC.ABC.ABC.ABC.ABC.ABC.ABC.ABC.ABC.ABC.ABC.ABC.ABC
.ABC3A$10.C3.C.ABC.ABC.ABC.ABC.ABC.ABC.ABC.ABC.ABC.ABC.ABC.ABC.ABC.AB
C.AB.A!

137ben
Posts: 343
Joined: June 18th, 2010, 8:18 pm

Re: Star Wars Rule

Post by 137ben » October 12th, 2010, 8:14 am

Construction of those spaceships might be difficult...
There are already examples in this thread of guns which fire spaceships. In fact, larger spaceships often appear naturally.

Here is a rake found naturally that fires non-standard spaceships:

Code: Select all

x = 109, y = 85, rule = 345/2/4
9$74.CBA$74.CBA3$27.2A42.C$27.2BA40.C.B$27.2CB17.2A20.B.C$29.CA16.2B
19.CA$30.B16.2CA17.B.CBA$29.AC18.B17.C2.CB$29.B19.C7.C5.C3.2A.C.A$28.
ACA31.B.B2.3A2.CBA6.2A$28.B.B30.C2AC5A2.CBA4.3ABA$28.CAC20.C2A5.CB2.
2A3.A.CB2A2.ACBABCA$34.ABC11.C.A.AB5.A.A3.2ACAC.A.2CB.B.C2.2A$29.A5.A
11.A.A.A.A.A3.A.A3.A.A.A.A3.A.A.A.A.A.A.A$28.10A8.B42A$27.BA3.A3.CB8.
A.A3.A3.A.B.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A$27.A.C12.ABC7.B4.3AB4.A.2AB
.B.B2.C2A3.B3.BC3A$42.ABC6.C5.A2.AC2.2BC6.C.B3.BC.AC.ABC3A$58.C3.BC2A
7.BC5.C.ABC.AB.A$49.C17.C12.CBA$67.BC2.C7.CBA$67.AB2.B6.CBA$68.A2CA5.
CBA10.C$69.2B5.CBA$56.2C11.2A4.CBA$56.2B16.CBA$56.2A15.CBA$59.C12.CBA
$59.BC2.C7.CBA$59.AB2.B6.CBA$60.A2CA5.CBA$61.2B5.CBA$48.2C11.2A4.CBA$
48.2B16.CBA$48.2A15.CBA$51.C12.CBA$51.BC2.C7.CBA$51.AB2.B6.CBA$52.A2C
A5.CBA$53.2B5.CBA$40.2C11.2A4.CBA$40.2B16.CBA$40.2A15.CBA$43.C12.CBA$
43.BC2.C7.CBA$42.A.B2.B$41.CB.B2C$39.C.A.C.A$32.2C7.CB2.CBA$32.2B13.C
BA$32.2A13.CBA!
Here is a p20 oscillator that acts as an eater from many different directions:

Code: Select all

x = 87, y = 72, rule = 345/2/4
10$44.2C$44.2B$44.2A2$44.2C$44.2B$44.2A2$44.2C$44.2B$44.2A$42.C4.C$
43.A2.A$36.C2.C3.4A3.C2.C$26.BC9.A.5A2.5A.A9.CB$25.A.A.A4.C.A.2A2.A.
2A.A2.2A.A.C4.A.A.A$26.3ACB3.B3A4.2A2.2A4.3AB3.BC3A$25.C.A3.C2.A.A.3A
.A.2A.A.3A.A.A2.C3.A.C$26.AB.2A6.A.2A.2A2.2A.2A.A6.2A.BA$27.3A.4A.2A.
A.2A.2A.2A.A.2A.4A.3A$26.C2.2A.A.2A2.A3.2A2.2A3.A2.2A.A.2A2.C$26.BC.A
.A.A.A.A.A.2A4.2A.A.A.A.A.A.A.CB$26.AB.13A2.2C2.13A.BA$28.C.A3.A6.CBA
2BABC6.A3.A.C$29.BA12.4A12.AB$10.CBA64.ABC$10.CBA64.ABC4$10.CBA64.ABC
$10.CBA64.ABC$29.BA12.4A12.AB$28.C.A3.A6.CBA2BABC6.A3.A.C$26.AB.13A2.
2C2.13A.BA$26.BC.A.A.A.A.A.A.2A4.2A.A.A.A.A.A.A.CB$26.C2.2A.A.2A2.A3.
2A2.2A3.A2.2A.A.2A2.C$27.3A.4A.2A.A.2A.2A.2A.A.2A.4A.3A$26.AB.2A6.A.
2A.2A2.2A.2A.A6.2A.BA$25.C.A3.C2.A.A.3A.A.2A.A.3A.A.A2.C3.A.C$26.3ACB
3.B3A4.2A2.2A4.3AB3.BC3A$25.A.A.A4.C.A.2A2.A.2A.A2.2A.A.C4.A.A.A$26.B
C9.A.5A2.5A.A9.CB$36.C2.C3.4A3.C2.C$43.A2.A$42.C4.C$44.2A$44.2B$44.2C
2$44.2A$44.2B$44.2C!

Awesomeness
Posts: 126
Joined: April 5th, 2009, 7:30 am

Re: Star Wars Rule

Post by Awesomeness » October 12th, 2010, 7:25 pm

Here is a 'shelled' rake– it requires a spaceship in front of it to function without converting into a common spaceship.

Also, a very unusual still life extender.

Code: Select all

x = 56, y = 56, rule = 345/2/4
4.ABC$2.ABC2.B2.C$.ABC2.A.C$ABC.3ACBA$ABC.3ACBA.C$.ABC.A.BA.CB8$6.B2.
C$5.A.C$3.3ACBA$3.3ACBA.C$4.A.BA.CB21$31.B$28.A.C.CA$27.4A.2B$27.2ABA
.A2.C$29.A.CBA.CB2$30.2A3.C$29.2ABC.A17.C.A$27.A.A.A.A.A17.A.B$26.29A
C$26.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A$24.3ACA.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A.A$
24.31AC$21.ABC29.A.B$21.ABC.ABC24.C.A$25.ABC$26.ABC$28.ABC!

Awesomeness
Posts: 126
Joined: April 5th, 2009, 7:30 am

Re: Star Wars Rule

Post by Awesomeness » October 16th, 2010, 10:55 pm

Sorry, for double post, but I'd like to bump this thread for everyone to see for an announcement.

I'd like to see a metacell (unit life cell) in Star Wars. So far we have made a bunch of logic gates but done nothing with them. We should change that.

So, to get started on this project.

Here's what it needs to do:
-Receive 8 inputs from its surrounding metacells in the form of up to 8 gliders.
-Take this input and calculate whether the cell will be on or off.
-Turn on the vast array of fanouts to create the bright block you see in metacells if the cell is on this generation.
-Output to the eight cells around it whether it is on or off.

Design considerations:
-We can choose to either make it read a rule table each time, so that we can run other rules in meta as well, or only take B3/S23 into consideration.
-We need to choose a period for the metacell. We will probably use a clock. Keep in mind we want this to be as fast as possible, but we need time for the inputs from the other cells to be received (metacells are very big).
-We need to chose a method of creating the giant block that is visible to the user. The only method I know of right now that would be fully implementable would be this:

Code: Select all

x = 256, y = 12, rule = 345/2/4
113.A2.A26.A2.A26.A2.A26.A2.A26.A2.A$112.6A24.6A24.6A24.6A24.6A$113.A
3.2A24.A3.2A24.A3.2A24.A3.2A24.A3.2A$CBA33.CBA33.CBA33.CBA2.A4.2A8.A
2.A2.A3.C2B2.A4.2A8.A2.A2.A3.C2B2.A4.2A8.A2.A2.A3.C2B2.A4.2A8.A2.A2.A
3.C2B2.A4.2A8.A2.A2.A$CBA33.CBA33.CBA33.CBA.2A5.2A6.9A2.C2B.2A5.2A6.
9A2.C2B.2A5.2A6.9A2.C2B.2A5.2A6.9A2.C2B.2A5.2A6.9A$113.A5.A8.A5.A8.A
5.A8.A5.A8.A5.A8.A5.A8.A5.A8.A5.A8.A5.A8.A5.A$113.A5.A8.A5.A8.A5.A8.A
5.A8.A5.A8.A5.A8.A5.A8.A5.A8.A5.A8.A5.A$112.9A2.C2B.2A5.2A6.9A2.C2B.
2A5.2A6.9A2.C2B.2A5.2A6.9A2.C2B.2A5.2A6.9A2.C2B.2A5.2A$113.A2.A2.A3.C
2B2.A4.2A8.A2.A2.A3.C2B2.A4.2A8.A2.A2.A3.C2B2.A4.2A8.A2.A2.A3.C2B2.A
4.2A8.A2.A2.A3.C2B2.A4.2A$128.A3.2A24.A3.2A24.A3.2A24.A3.2A24.A3.2A$
127.6A24.6A24.6A24.6A24.6A$128.A2.A26.A2.A26.A2.A26.A2.A26.A2.A!
But it seems rather thin. A much more vivid implementation would be to use two spacefillers:

Code: Select all

x = 89, y = 82, rule = 345/2/4
83.A2.A$82.6A$81.2A.2A.2A$82.2A2.2A$82.A.2A.A$76.ABC.A.2A2.2A$75.ABC.
AB2A.2A.2A$74.ABC.ABC.6A$74.ABC.ABC.A3.A$75.ABC.AB.C$76.ABC.ACB$77.AB
C.BA$78.ABCA$79.AB.C$80.ACB$81.BA$79.2CA$79.2B$79.2A45$8.2A$8.2B$7.A
2C$6.AB$6.BCA$6.C.BA$7.ACBA$6.AB.CBA$6.BCA.CBA$6.C.BA.CBA$2.A3.A.CBA.
CBA$.6A.CBA.CBA$2A.2A.2ABA.CBA$.2A2.2A.A.CBA$.A.2A.A$.2A2.2A$2A.2A.2A
$.6A$2.A2.A!
Though I have no idea how to turn it on or off.
-I will need someone to help me with the logic gates. I am not very good at using logic gates directly for computation and I'll need your help to do that part.

If we work together we can do this! I look forward to replies!

137ben
Posts: 343
Joined: June 18th, 2010, 8:18 pm

Re: Star Wars Rule

Post by 137ben » October 17th, 2010, 10:11 am

First off, the "display" could be similar to the OTCA metapixl in life:

Code: Select all

x = 15, y = 15, rule = 345/2/4
12.ABC$12.ABC3$12.ABC$12.ABC3$12.ABC$12.ABC3$2A2.2A2.2A$2B2.2B2.2B$2C
2.2C2.2C!
As for what rule, reading a rule table would require completely reconfiguring the internal logic gates. We should really just pick one rule. Actually, would it be plausible to make it run starwars?

It should however be noted that we currently do not have ANY diagnal spaceships. In fact, we don't have any spaceships traveling with any velocity other than c. This shouldn't be a problem with the "delayer"

Code: Select all

x = 19, y = 15, rule = 345/2/4
15.ABC$15.ABC10$7.A$.A4.3A$3A4.A7.ABC$.A13.ABC!
but it does mean the inputs from diagonal cells will lag substantially behind those from orthogonal cells.

I'd also be interested to see if we could get spaceships of arbitrarily high periods, as well as spaceships moving at any speed other than c.

knightlife
Posts: 566
Joined: May 31st, 2009, 12:08 am

Re: Star Wars Rule

Post by knightlife » October 17th, 2010, 5:37 pm

137ben wrote:First off, the "display" could be similar to the OTCA metapixl in life
I agree:

Code: Select all

x = 388, y = 389, rule = 345/2/4
186.CBA$186.CBA27.C.BA$215.B.2A$215.AC3AC$CBA213.B.A$CBA214.A.C2$186.
CBA$186.CBA27.C.BA$215.B.2A$215.AC3AC$CBA213.B.A$CBA214.A.C2$186.CBA$
186.CBA27.C.BA$215.B.2A$215.AC3AC$CBA213.B.A$CBA214.A.C2$186.CBA$186.
CBA27.C.BA$215.B.2A$215.AC3AC$CBA213.B.A$CBA214.A.C2$186.CBA$186.CBA
27.C.BA$215.B.2A$215.AC3AC$CBA213.B.A$CBA214.A.C2$186.CBA$186.CBA27.C
.BA$215.B.2A$215.AC3AC$CBA213.B.A$CBA214.A.C2$186.CBA$186.CBA27.C.BA$
215.B.2A$215.AC3AC$CBA213.B.A$CBA214.A.C2$186.CBA$186.CBA27.C.BA$215.
B.2A$215.AC3AC$CBA213.B.A$CBA214.A.C2$186.CBA$186.CBA27.C.BA$215.B.2A
$215.AC3AC$CBA213.B.A$CBA214.A.C2$186.CBA$186.CBA27.C.BA$215.B.2A$
215.AC3AC$CBA213.B.A$CBA214.A.C2$186.CBA$186.CBA27.C.BA$215.B.2A$215.
AC3AC$CBA213.B.A$CBA214.A.C2$186.CBA$186.CBA27.C.BA$215.B.2A$215.AC3A
C$CBA213.B.A$CBA214.A.C2$186.CBA$186.CBA27.C.BA$215.B.2A$215.AC3AC$CB
A213.B.A$CBA214.A.C2$186.CBA$186.CBA27.C.BA$215.B.2A$215.AC3AC$CBA
213.B.A$CBA214.A.C2$186.CBA$186.CBA27.C.BA$215.B.2A$215.AC3AC$CBA213.
B.A$CBA214.A.C2$186.CBA$186.CBA27.C.BA$215.B.2A$215.AC3AC$CBA213.B.A$
CBA214.A.C2$186.CBA$186.CBA27.C.BA$215.B.2A$215.AC3AC$CBA213.B.A$CBA
214.A.C2$186.CBA$186.CBA27.C.BA$215.B.2A$215.AC3AC$CBA213.B.A$CBA214.
A.C2$186.CBA$186.CBA27.C.BA$215.B.2A$215.AC3AC$CBA213.B.A$CBA214.A.C
2$186.CBA$186.CBA27.C.BA$215.B.2A$215.AC3AC$CBA213.B.A$CBA214.A.C2$
186.CBA$186.CBA27.C.BA$215.B.2A$215.AC3AC$CBA213.B.A$CBA214.A.C2$186.
CBA$186.CBA27.C.BA$215.B.2A$215.AC3AC$CBA213.B.A$CBA214.A.C2$186.CBA$
186.CBA27.C.BA$215.B.2A$215.AC3AC$CBA213.B.A$CBA214.A.C2$186.CBA$186.
CBA27.C.BA$215.B.2A$215.AC3AC$CBA213.B.A$CBA214.A.C2$224.C6.C6.C6.C6.
C6.C6.C6.C6.C6.C6.C6.C6.C6.C6.C6.C6.C6.C6.C6.C6.C6.C6.C6.C$222.A.A.C
2.A.A.C2.A.A.C2.A.A.C2.A.A.C2.A.A.C2.A.A.C2.A.A.C2.A.A.C2.A.A.C2.A.A.
C2.A.A.C2.A.A.C2.A.A.C2.A.A.C2.A.A.C2.A.A.C2.A.A.C2.A.A.C2.A.A.C2.A.A
.C2.A.A.C2.A.A.C2.A.A.C$222.B3A3.B3A3.B3A3.B3A3.B3A3.B3A3.B3A3.B3A3.B
3A3.B3A3.B3A3.B3A3.B3A3.B3A3.B3A3.B3A3.B3A3.B3A3.B3A3.B3A3.B3A3.B3A3.
B3A3.B3A$223.2A.A3.2A.A3.2A.A3.2A.A3.2A.A3.2A.A3.2A.A3.2A.A3.2A.A3.2A
.A3.2A.A3.2A.A3.2A.A3.2A.A3.2A.A3.2A.A3.2A.A3.2A.A3.2A.A3.2A.A3.2A.A
3.2A.A3.2A.A3.2A.A$222.C.CB3.C.CB3.C.CB3.C.CB3.C.CB3.C.CB3.C.CB3.C.CB
3.C.CB3.C.CB3.C.CB3.C.CB3.C.CB3.C.CB3.C.CB3.C.CB3.C.CB3.C.CB3.C.CB3.C
.CB3.C.CB3.C.CB3.C.CB3.C.CB$223.BA5.BA5.BA5.BA5.BA5.BA5.BA5.BA5.BA5.B
A5.BA5.BA5.BA5.BA5.BA5.BA5.BA5.BA5.BA5.BA5.BA5.BA5.BA5.BA27$221.2A5.
2A5.2A5.2A5.2A5.2A5.2A5.2A5.2A5.2A5.2A5.2A5.2A5.2A5.2A5.2A5.2A5.2A5.
2A5.2A5.2A5.2A5.2A5.2A$221.2B5.2B5.2B5.2B5.2B5.2B5.2B5.2B5.2B5.2B5.2B
5.2B5.2B5.2B5.2B5.2B5.2B5.2B5.2B5.2B5.2B5.2B5.2B5.2B$221.2C5.2C5.2C5.
2C5.2C5.2C5.2C5.2C5.2C5.2C5.2C5.2C5.2C5.2C5.2C5.2C5.2C5.2C5.2C5.2C5.
2C5.2C5.2C5.2C184$225.2A5.2A5.2A5.2A5.2A5.2A5.2A5.2A5.2A5.2A5.2A5.2A
5.2A5.2A5.2A5.2A5.2A5.2A5.2A5.2A5.2A5.2A5.2A5.2A$225.2B5.2B5.2B5.2B5.
2B5.2B5.2B5.2B5.2B5.2B5.2B5.2B5.2B5.2B5.2B5.2B5.2B5.2B5.2B5.2B5.2B5.
2B5.2B5.2B$225.2C5.2C5.2C5.2C5.2C5.2C5.2C5.2C5.2C5.2C5.2C5.2C5.2C5.2C
5.2C5.2C5.2C5.2C5.2C5.2C5.2C5.2C5.2C5.2C!
The gun is p5 but turns into a p4 oscillator when hit with a glider. Fortunately the reverse action is possible, making a convenient on-off gun:

Code: Select all

x = 221, y = 6, rule = 345/2/4
11.CBA7.CBA101.CBA58.CBA$11.CBA7.CBA101.CBA58.CBA27.C.BA$215.B.2A$
215.AC3AC$CBA12.CBA31.CBA113.CBA48.B.A$CBA12.CBA31.CBA113.CBA49.A.C!
Even a single glider can be fired from the gun by turning it on and off at the proper time, but..
The on and off controls must be synchonized to the oscillator/gun and are easier to deal with if p20 glider streams are used (or a multiple of 20).
Of course, a metacell doesn't need such fine control of the display, but the mechanism can be used for other operations as well.

There is a p4 gun/oscillator that can be controlled...
The display turns on rather nicely this way:

Code: Select all

x = 19, y = 75, rule = 345/2/4
12.A$11.3A$12.A5$8.CB$7.2A.A.CBA.CBA$8.3A.CBA.CBA$CBA4.BA.B$CBA4.A.C
4$8.CB$7.2A.A.CBA.CBA$8.3A.CBA.CBA$CBA4.BA.B$CBA4.A.C4$8.CB$7.2A.A.CB
A.CBA$8.3A.CBA.CBA$CBA4.BA.B$CBA4.A.C4$8.CB$7.2A.A.CBA.CBA$8.3A.CBA.C
BA$CBA4.BA.B$CBA4.A.C4$8.CB$7.2A.A.CBA.CBA$8.3A.CBA.CBA$CBA4.BA.B$CBA
4.A.C4$8.CB$7.2A.A.CBA.CBA$8.3A.CBA.CBA$CBA4.BA.B$CBA4.A.C4$8.CB$7.2A
.A.CBA.CBA$8.3A.CBA.CBA$CBA4.BA.B$CBA4.A.C13$12.2A$12.2B$12.2C!
However, the p4 gun is restarted as a mirror image. Still okay as a metacell display but not ideal for controlling it.

Awesomeness
Posts: 126
Joined: April 5th, 2009, 7:30 am

Re: Star Wars Rule

Post by Awesomeness » October 18th, 2010, 7:27 am

Okay, we now have good screen possibilities.

Now, we need to use them.

What the cell will do, in pseudo code is:

Code: Select all

if cell is on {
	if has three neighbors {
		(do nothing)
	} else {
		turn off
	}
} else {
	if cell has 2 or 3 neighbors {
		turn on
	}
}
But I need someone experienced with logic gates to help me out. How would this be designed?

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