Difference between revisions of "Herschel transmitter"

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(infobox)
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{{Pattern
+
{{Conduit
 
|name        = Herschel transmitter
 
|name        = Herschel transmitter
 
|pname        = herscheltransmitterstable
 
|pname        = herscheltransmitterstable
|type        = Conduit
+
|conduitfor  = Herschel
 +
|convertsto  = Glider
 
|c            = 26
 
|c            = 26
 
|bx          = 19
 
|bx          = 19
Line 8: Line 9:
 
|discoverer  = Paul Callahan
 
|discoverer  = Paul Callahan
 
|discoveryear = 1997
 
|discoveryear = 1997
|life105      =
 
|life106      =
 
|plaintext    =
 
 
|rle          = true
 
|rle          = true
 
}}
 
}}

Revision as of 11:57, 20 January 2018

Herschel transmitter
x = 19, y = 18, rule = B3/S23 6b2o$5bobo$3b3o$2bo3bo6bo$2b2ob2o6b3o$13bobo$15bo3$2obo$ob2o4$15b2o$ 15bo$16b3o$18bo! #C [[ THUMBSIZE 2 THEME 6 GRID GRIDMAJOR 0 SUPPRESS THUMBLAUNCH ]] #C [[ AUTOSTART ]]
Pattern type Conduit
Input Herschel
Output Glider
Number of cells 26
Bounding box 19×18
Discovered by Paul Callahan
Year of discovery 1997

A Herschel transmitter is a Herschel-to-glider converter that produces two gliders on parallel tracks that can be used as input to a Herschel receiver. If the gliders are far enough apart, a suitably-oriented mirror image of the receiver will also work: the first glider triggers the receiver and the second glider deletes the extra beehive.

The image to the right shows a stable Herschel transmitter found by Paul Callahan in May 1997.

External links