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Welcome to LifeWiki,
the wiki for Conway's Game of Life.
Currently contains 2,146 articles.
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This week's featured article

Highlife.png
HighLife is a Life-like cellular automaton in which cells survive from one generation to the next if they have 2 or 3 neighbours, and are born if they have 3 or 6 neighbours; that is, it has rulestring "B36/S23". It was named by John Conway and was first considered in 1994 by Nathan Thompson. It is mainly of interest due to a simple replicator that it allows.

Because its rulestring is so similar to that of Conway's Game of Life, many simple patterns exhibit the same behavior in both rules; it's only when patterns get complex that their behavior differs. Nonetheless, it exhibits such rich structure that Conway himself stated

"It seems to me that 'B36/S23' is really the game I should have found, since it's so rich in nice things."

All of the most common still lifes, oscillators and spaceships from the standard Life rules behave the exact same under the HighLife rules, including the block, beehive, blinker, glider, lightweight spaceship, middleweight spaceship, and heavyweight spaceship. On the other hand, even though traffic lights and honey farms themselves behave the same in both rules, they do not occur naturally in HighLife with any sort of regularity due to their common predecessors being unstable.

In the news

Pattern collection

The LifeWiki contains one of the most comprehensive catalogues of patterns available on the internet. Within it you will find:
Download.gif Download pattern collection
4.5 MB .zip archive containing the 3500+ RLE pattern files used on the wiki

Did you know...

  • ... there are 'Heisenburp' reactions which can detect the passage of a glider without affecting it in any way?
  • ... Corderships can be constructed using individual switch engines placed arbitrarily far from each other, that will still support each other using intermediary gliders and stable objects?
  • ... fuses can be made that burn arbitrarily slowly, based on sending spaceships back and forth between two rows of stable objects?
  • ... there exist 'lone dot' agars consisting of isolated cells in every generation?
  • ... that some types of spaceship, but not all, support stable Heisenburp technology, where an arrangement of still lifes detects the passage of the spaceship, emits a signal, and returns to its original state?
  • ... that, while it is impossible to build a true stable Heisenburp device that detects a passing glider without even temporarily affecting it, there are several known stable pseudo-Heisenburp devices?
  • ... that the name of the Bandersnatch, a color-changing lane-shifter device discovered in 2020, is derived from a Lewis Carroll poem that also supplied names for the Snark, the boojum reflector, and the Bellman search utility?
  • ... that the first rake that produces spaceships travelling in the same direction but slower was found in 2003, using a c/2 rake to produce 2c/5 spaceships?
  • ... that it is possible for a single Life object to simulate the evolution of an arbitrary number of other Life objects at the same time (although at increasingly slower speeds)?
  • ... that the Fast Forward Force Field reaction can transport an LWSS 11 spaces in 6 generations, creating the illusion of super-light-speed travel?          
Showing 10 items out of 128 More did you know...