Difference between revisions of "Ship-tie"

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m (diagonal D2 symmetry)
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==External links==
 
==External links==
*[http://home.interserv.com/~mniemiec/still12.htm Life Twelve-Bit Still-Lifes] by [[Mark Niemiec]]
 
 
{{LinkWeisstein|filename=Ship-Tie.html}}
 
{{LinkWeisstein|filename=Ship-Tie.html}}
 
{{LinkLexicon|filename=lex_s.htm#shiptie}}
 
{{LinkLexicon|filename=lex_s.htm#shiptie}}
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{{LinkCatagolue|xs12_g8o653z11}}
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{{LinkNiemiec|p1-12.htm|patternname=The 121 twelve-bit still-lifes}}
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[[Category:Patterns with diagonal D2 symmetry]]
 
[[Category:Patterns with diagonal D2 symmetry]]

Revision as of 17:19, 21 March 2016

Ship-tie
x = 6, y = 6, rule = B3/S23 2o$obo$b2o$3b2o$3bobo$4b2o! #C [[ THUMBSIZE 2 THEME 6 GRID GRIDMAJOR 0 SUPPRESS THUMBLAUNCH ]] #C Still life
Pattern type Strict still life
Number of cells 12
Bounding box 6×6
Discovered by Unknown
Year of discovery Unknown

Ship-tie (or half fleet) It is the ninth most common still life, being less common than long boat but more common than barge.[1] Its name is derived from boat-tie.

See also

References

  1. Achim Flammenkamp (September 7, 2004). "Most seen natural occurring ash objects in Game of Life". Retrieved on November 8, 2009.

External links