Beehive

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Beehive
x = 4, y = 3, rule = B3/S23 b2o$o2bo$b2o! #C [[ THUMBSIZE 2 THEME 6 GRID GRIDMAJOR 0 SUPPRESS THUMBLAUNCH ]] #C Still life
Pattern type Strict still life
Number of cells 6
Bounding box 4×3
Frequency class 0.9
Discovered by JHC group
Year of discovery 1969

Beehive is a 6-cell still life. It can be seen as a weld of two tubs. As a tetromino descendant, it was one of the first objects found.

Behaviour

Beehives are frequently born in a set of four called honey farm.

It is possible to turn a single beehive into one by adding a corner (turning it into a bun), adding a cell to the "tip" of it (the bit with one cell, adding it to the longer end will result in an R-pentomino grandson) or by adding one cell inside it. There are also formations of two beehives that also occur fairly commonly, evolving from seeds known as butterfly and teardrop.

A beehive can be eaten with a block, a reaction that allows the construction of the queen bee shuttle and further patterns based on it.

Some reactions push a beehive one cell. If space permits, the beehive push catalyst can push it back.

Sequences that produce just a beehive

x = 5, y = 3, rule = B3/S23 3bo$b4o$2o! #C [[ THUMBSIZE 2 THEME 6 GRID GRIDMAJOR 0 SUPPRESS THUMBLAUNCH ]] #C [[ GPS 16 THUMBSIZE 2 ]]
Procrastinator[1]
(click above to open LifeViewer)
RLE: here Plaintext: here
x = 9, y = 4, rule = B3/S23 b2o$o2bo3b2o$obo4b2o$2bo! #C [[ THUMBSIZE 2 THEME 6 GRID GRIDMAJOR 0 SUPPRESS THUMBLAUNCH ]] #C [[ GPS 16 THUMBSIZE 2 ]]
Another beehive predecessor
(click above to open LifeViewer)
RLE: here Plaintext: here

The first pattern above is the "procrastinator", mentioned in Lifeline Volume 4. It is a fairly common sequence. It produces a single beehive after 76 generations.

The second pattern above is a phi spark predecessor hitting a block, which then becomes a traffic light hitting a block, which then becomes a single beehive. The beehive forms in generation 51, but it takes until generation 79 for the remaining active region to clear. It is semi-common, but not as common as the procrastinator. An example of a beehive being pushed one cell can be seen here.

Commonness

Beehive is the second most common still life on Adam P. Goucher's Catagolue, being less common than block but more common than loaf. Among all still lifes with 6 cells, it is the absolute most common, followed by ship.[2]

The beehive was also the second most common still life in Achim Flammenkamp's census, again being less common than block but over three times as common as loaf.[3]

Glider synthesis

There is a perpendicular 2-glider collision that produces a beehive via an intermediate tail.

See also

References

  1. Robert Wainwright (December 1971). Lifeline, vol 4, page 4.
  2. Adam P. Goucher. "Statistics". Catagolue. Retrieved on June 17, 2022.
  3. Achim Flammenkamp (September 7, 2004). "Most seen natural occurring ash objects in Game of Life". Retrieved on January 15, 2009.

External links