Big S

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Big S
x = 7, y = 6, rule = B3/S23 4b2o$3bo2bo$3bob2o$2obo$o2bo$b2o! #C [[ THUMBSIZE 2 THEME 6 GRID GRIDMAJOR 0 SUPPRESS THUMBLAUNCH ]] #C Still life
Pattern type Strict still life
Number of cells 14
Bounding box 7×6
Frequency class 13.9
Discovered by MIT group
Year of discovery 1971
For other uses of 'S', see S (disambiguation).

Big S (or large S[1] or S-spiral[2] or simply S[3]) is a simple 14-cell still life discovered by the MIT group in 1971.[4] It is produced by colliding a pi-heptomino with a boat.

Commonness

Big S is the twenty-second most common still life in Achim Flammenkamp's census, being less common than snake but more common than bi-pond.[5] It is also the twenty-ninth most common object on Adam P. Goucher's Catagolue.[6]

Because it usually forms from specific predecessors, the difference in frequency in asymmetric soups compared to C2_2 (the symmetry the object has) is almost negligible. Similarly, in rules that support the object but not its predecessors, such as HighLife, it is much less common.

Gallery

2o$obo$bo3$2b3o$2bobo$2bobo! #C [[ THUMBSIZE 2 THEME 6 GRID GRIDMAJOR 0 SUPPRESS THUMBLAUNCH ]] #C [[ GPS 6 THUMBSIZE 2 STOP 16 WIDTH 800 ]]
Almost all Big Ses are formed through the sequence that contains
generation 16 of this pattern, with the glider optional.
Generation 0 is the aforementioned pi+boat collision.
(click above to open LifeViewer)
RLE: here Plaintext: here

See also

References

  1. "Large S". The Life Lexicon. Stephen Silver. Retrieved on May 2, 2009.
  2. "S-spiral". The Life Lexicon. Stephen Silver. Retrieved on May 22, 2009.
  3. "S". The Life Lexicon. Stephen Silver. Retrieved on May 2, 2009.
  4. Dean Hickerson's oscillator stamp collection. Retrieved on June 18, 2009.
  5. Achim Flammenkamp (September 7, 2004). "Most seen natural occurring ash objects in Game of Life". Retrieved on March 30, 2010.
  6. Adam P. Goucher. "Statistics". Catagolue. Retrieved on June 24, 2016.

External links