Dot

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Dot
x = 1, y = 1, rule = B3/S23 o! #C [[ THUMBSIZE 2 THEME 6 GRID GRIDMAJOR 0 SUPPRESS THUMBLAUNCH ]] #C [[ AUTOSTART ZOOM 64 GPS 1 PAUSE 2 LOOP 4 ]]
Pattern type Spark
Number of cells 1
Bounding box 1 × 1
Discovered by John Conway
Year of discovery 1969

A dot is a single cell, and it is the only possible haplomino (1-cell polyomino). It is almost exclusively used as a spark, in which case it is referred to as a dot spark.

Dot sparks are one of the most common sparks in existence, and are highly favoured due to their ability to perturb objects.

Despite dots being common, they are usually not alone. A pattern that dies completely will very rarely have exactly one live cell immediately before death. For example, none of the two-glider collisions that die do so.

Production of dots as sparks

Dot sparks are created by a wide array of oscillators and spaceships. Examples include the xWSS family, all of which create at least one dot spark.

Use in oscillators

The barberpole family of oscillators have rotors comprised solely of isolated dots which sustain life despite immediately dying. Agars also exist which are comprised solely of dots.

Larger objects can also be perturbed by dot sparks to create oscillators of a higher period.

See also