E-heptomino

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E-heptomino
b3o$2o$b2o! #C [[ THUMBSIZE 2 THEME 6 GRID GRIDMAJOR 0 SUPPRESS THUMBLAUNCH ]]
Pattern type Methuselah
Number of cells 7
Bounding box 4 × 3
MCPS 7
Lifespan 343 generations
Final population 52
L/I 49
F/I 7.4
F/L 0.152
L/MCPS 49
Discovered by John Conway
Year of discovery 1970

E-heptomino (or E) is a semi-common heptomino named by John Conway.[1] It stabilizes at generation 343, leaving behind four beehives, five blocks, one blinker and one escaping glider.[2]

The following is a pattern that eventually becomes the immediate child of the E-heptomino sequence in 19 generations, putting them 18 generations apart. It has two six-cell great-great-grandparents (3bo$2b2o2$bo$2o and 2bo$2b2o2$bo$2o).

x = 4, y = 4, rule = B3/S23 3o$3bo$o2bo$2b2o! #C [[ THUMBSIZE 2 THEME 6 GRID GRIDMAJOR 0 SUPPRESS THUMBLAUNCH ]] #C [[ GPS 8 THUMBSIZE 2 ]]
(click above to open LifeViewer)
RLE: here Plaintext: here

The following is a pattern that converges to the E-heptomino sequence, but in a completely different way. Generation 22 of this pattern is generation 12 of the E-heptomino; both are a lumps of muck and a block, but the lumps of muck form in completely different ways.

x = 5, y = 5, rule = B3/S23 2bo$bob2o$o3bo$bobo$2bo! #C [[ THUMBSIZE 2 THEME 6 GRID GRIDMAJOR 0 SUPPRESS THUMBLAUNCH ]] #C [[ GPS 8 THUMBSIZE 2 ]]
(click above to open LifeViewer)
RLE: here Plaintext: here

Here is E-heptomino at generation 343, stabilized except for an escaping glider:

E-heptomino at generation 343

See also

References

  1. Robert Wainwright (March 1971). Lifeline, vol 1, page 1.
  2. Robert Wainwright (June 1971). Lifeline, vol 2, page 1.

External links