Induction coil

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An induction coil is any object used to stabilize an edge (or edges) of another pattern without touching. While still lifes and oscillators can be used as induction coils, there are also many induction coils that are not stable by themselves (such as table).

Examples

The tubs on the sides of the Gray counter are used as induction coils, as are the blocks and snakes used in the Hertz oscillator and the heptomino at the bottom of the mathematician.

The Gray counter is stabilized by two tubs.
The Hertz oscillator is stabilized by two blocks and two snakes.
The Mathematician is mutually stabilized by a crinkly heptomino.

Naming of induction coil systems

Main article: Pattern naming

Still lifes which contain induction coils are named depending on how the induction coils interact with each other.

This only counts cases where the two induction coils have a single, straight inducting face, and the resulting arrangement is disjoint (i.e. has at least two islands).

Two identical induction coils
  • If the induction coils in question are themselves mirror-symmetric, there are two possibilities:
    • Mirrored [X]: where the arrangement has both mirror and rotational symmetry
    • Rotated [X]: where the arrangement only has rotational symmetry, i.e. the components are skewed
  • If the induction coils are asymmetric, there are five possibilities:
    • Cis-mirrored [X]: Has mirror symmetry, and is not skewed
    • Trans-mirrored [X]: Has rotational symmetry, and is not skewed
    • Shift-mirrored [X]: Asymmetric, skewed
    • Cis-rotated [X]: Has rotational symmetry, higher-density zones nearer center
    • Trans-rotated [X]: Has rotational symmetry, higher-density zones near outside
Two different induction coils
  • If the induction coils in question are themselves mirror-symmetric, there are two possibilities:
    • [X] and [Y]: where the arrangement has mirror symmetry
    • Skew [X] and [Y]: the overall pattern is asymmetric
  • If only one induction coil is mirror-symmetric, there are three(?) possibilities:
    • Meta-[X] and [Y]: both faces are aligned
    • Ortho-[X] and [Y]: skewed; dense part of asymmetric object is near center
    • Para-[X] and [Y]: skewed; dense part of asymmetric object is near outside
  • If both induction coils are asymmetric, there are six possibilities:
    • Cis-[X] and [Y]: roughly mirror symmetric
    • Trans-[X] and [Y]: roughly rotationally symmetric
    • Shift-[X] and [Y]: System unknown
    • Meta-[X] and [Y]: System unknown
    • Para-[X] and [Y]: System unknown
    • Ortho-[X] and [Y]: System unknown
Induction coil stabilised by an object which is stable by itself

When an induction coil is stabilised by a still life, the still life is said to be on the induction coil (e.g. block on table). This is in contrast to and, which is used for two mutually-stabilising induction coils (e.g. table and dock).

Working list

To adjust patterns manually, it is convenient to have the small and useful induction coils handy. However, as the examples show, stabilizing a long edge can usually be accomplished by judiciously placing snakes, blocks and occasionally tubs along its length. Due consideration must be given to their spacing, and especially the overhang at edges and corners. Common short coils follow:

length Preblock stabilizer - -
3, 3 high
3, 4 high -
3, 5 high -
4, 2 high - -
4, 3 high
4, 4 high
5, 3 high -
5, 4 high
6, 3 high

See also

External links